Obama, Biden meet with GOP senators on Syria

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"This evening, the president dropped by the dinner that the Vice President hosted for republican senators," the White House said in a statement. 

Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, were scheduled to host the senators for dinner as part of the White House's effort to win support for military action in Syria.

The president spent approximately an hour and 20 minutes with Biden and the senators.

The White House said Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamTrump’s feud with the press in the spotlight Senators eye new sanctions against Iran Republicans play clean up on Trump's foreign policy MORE (R-S.C.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsPruitt sworn in as EPA chief Comey meets Intel senators amid uproar over Trump-Russia ties EPA breaks Twitter silence to congratulate new head MORE (R-Maine), Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissWyden hammers CIA chief over Senate spying Cruz is a liability Inside Paul Ryan’s brain trust MORE (R-Ga.), Bob CorkerBob CorkerRepublicans play clean up on Trump's foreign policy GOP Congress unnerved by Trump bumps Trump makes nuclear mistake on arms control treaty with Russia MORE (R-Tenn.), Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteNH governor 'not aware’ of major voter fraud Former NH AG: 'Allegations of voter fraud in NH are baseless' Ex-NH GOP chair calls Trump's voter fraud bluff with ,000 bet MORE (R-N.H.) and Deb FischerDeb FischerGOP considers ways to ‘modernize’ endangered species law GOP senator turns to equal pay for women, paid leave Overnight Cybersecurity: Election systems to remain 'critical infrastructure' MORE (R-Neb.) attended the dinner. 

The Hill's latest whip list counts nine Senate Republicans as "yes/leaning yes" while 14 GOP senators are listed as "no/leaning no."

Ayotte, Chambliss, Corker and Graham are listed as "yes/leaning yes." Collins and Fischer are among 23 Senate Republicans listed as "undecided."

Earlier Sunday, White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonoughDenis McDonoughObama's chief of staff joins foundation with focus on jobs Chicago mayor visits White House to meet with Trump aides Obama staffers challenged to WH scavenger hunt on final day MORE said lawmakers would vote to authorize military strikes, despite mounting congressional opposition.

McDonough brushed aside the rising number of voices in Congress against military action, saying it was still “too early” to reach conclusions.

“This resolution is going to pass after we work this,” McDonough said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Obama will also conduct interviews with six television networks ahead of a primetime speech on Syria Tuesday night in an effort to win over lawmakers and the public.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidIf Gorsuch pick leads to 'crisis,' Dems should look in mirror first Senate confirms Mulvaney to be Trump’s budget chief Democrats declare victory after Puzder bows out MORE (D-Nev.) filed the use-of-force resolution on the Senate floor Friday, setting up a Wednesday vote to end debate and move to final passage. The critical cloture vote will happen on the 12-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon and the one-year anniversary of the Benghazi attack.

Another Democratic aide said the vote could happen sooner if Republicans waive certain procedural requirements.

--This report was updated at 9:45 p.m.