Obama, Biden meet with GOP senators on Syria

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"This evening, the president dropped by the dinner that the Vice President hosted for republican senators," the White House said in a statement. 

Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, were scheduled to host the senators for dinner as part of the White House's effort to win support for military action in Syria.

The president spent approximately an hour and 20 minutes with Biden and the senators.

The White House said Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamGorsuch rewrites playbook for confirmation hearings Dem senator: House Intel chairman may have revealed classified info The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-S.C.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsFive takeaways from Labor pick’s confirmation hearing ObamaCare repeal faces last obstacle before House vote Live coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing MORE (R-Maine), Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissWyden hammers CIA chief over Senate spying Cruz is a liability Inside Paul Ryan’s brain trust MORE (R-Ga.), Bob CorkerBob CorkerRand Paul roils the Senate with NATO blockade Lawmakers want Trump commitment to help Iraq post-ISIS Trump needs a united front to win overseas MORE (R-Tenn.), Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteFEC commissioner to Trump: Prove voter fraud Live coverage: Day three of Supreme Court nominee hearing Lewandowski saw no evidence of voter fraud in New Hampshire MORE (R-N.H.) and Deb FischerDeb FischerGOP rep scolds Gillibrand for tearing into Marine general over nude-photo scandal Senators tear into Marines on nude photo scandal Five takeaways from the Scott Pruitt emails MORE (R-Neb.) attended the dinner. 

The Hill's latest whip list counts nine Senate Republicans as "yes/leaning yes" while 14 GOP senators are listed as "no/leaning no."

Ayotte, Chambliss, Corker and Graham are listed as "yes/leaning yes." Collins and Fischer are among 23 Senate Republicans listed as "undecided."

Earlier Sunday, White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonoughDenis McDonoughObama chief of staff: 'The president cannot order a wiretap' Obama's chief of staff joins foundation with focus on jobs Chicago mayor visits White House to meet with Trump aides MORE said lawmakers would vote to authorize military strikes, despite mounting congressional opposition.

McDonough brushed aside the rising number of voices in Congress against military action, saying it was still “too early” to reach conclusions.

“This resolution is going to pass after we work this,” McDonough said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Obama will also conduct interviews with six television networks ahead of a primetime speech on Syria Tuesday night in an effort to win over lawmakers and the public.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThis obscure Senate rule could let VP Mike Pence fully repeal ObamaCare once and for all Sharron Angle to challenge GOP rep in Nevada Fox's Watters asks Trump whom he would fire: Baldwin, Schumer or Zucker MORE (D-Nev.) filed the use-of-force resolution on the Senate floor Friday, setting up a Wednesday vote to end debate and move to final passage. The critical cloture vote will happen on the 12-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon and the one-year anniversary of the Benghazi attack.

Another Democratic aide said the vote could happen sooner if Republicans waive certain procedural requirements.

--This report was updated at 9:45 p.m.