Obama, Biden meet with GOP senators on Syria

ADVERTISEMENT
"This evening, the president dropped by the dinner that the Vice President hosted for republican senators," the White House said in a statement. 

Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, were scheduled to host the senators for dinner as part of the White House's effort to win support for military action in Syria.

The president spent approximately an hour and 20 minutes with Biden and the senators.

The White House said Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamFive key moments from Trump's first 100 days GOP senator: There will never be full U.S.-Mexico border wall The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-S.C.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsCollins: I'm not working with Freedom Caucus chairman on healthcare Mexico: Recent deportations 'a violation' of US immigration rules White House denies misleading public in aircraft carrier mix-up MORE (R-Maine), Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissGOP hopefuls crowd Georgia special race Democrats go for broke in race for Tom Price's seat Spicer: Trump will 'help the team' if needed in Georgia special election MORE (R-Ga.), Bob CorkerBob CorkerThe Hill's 12:30 Report Senate Foreign Relations chair: Erdogan referendum win 'not something to applaud' Groups warn of rural health 'crisis' under ObamaCare repeal MORE (R-Tenn.), Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteBottom Line How Gorsuch's confirmation shapes the next Supreme Court battle THE MEMO: Trump set to notch needed win with Gorsuch MORE (R-N.H.) and Deb FischerDeb FischerDem labels infrastructure ‘top thing’ Trump can accomplish Senators press the FCC on rural broadband affordability Smart investments in America’s future MORE (R-Neb.) attended the dinner. 

The Hill's latest whip list counts nine Senate Republicans as "yes/leaning yes" while 14 GOP senators are listed as "no/leaning no."

Ayotte, Chambliss, Corker and Graham are listed as "yes/leaning yes." Collins and Fischer are among 23 Senate Republicans listed as "undecided."

Earlier Sunday, White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonoughDenis McDonoughSunday shows preview: McMaster hits circuit for second straight week Obama chief of staff: 'The president cannot order a wiretap' Obama's chief of staff joins foundation with focus on jobs MORE said lawmakers would vote to authorize military strikes, despite mounting congressional opposition.

McDonough brushed aside the rising number of voices in Congress against military action, saying it was still “too early” to reach conclusions.

“This resolution is going to pass after we work this,” McDonough said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Obama will also conduct interviews with six television networks ahead of a primetime speech on Syria Tuesday night in an effort to win over lawmakers and the public.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidWeek ahead: House to revive Yucca Mountain fight Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road 'Tuesday Group' turncoats must use recess to regroup on ObamaCare MORE (D-Nev.) filed the use-of-force resolution on the Senate floor Friday, setting up a Wednesday vote to end debate and move to final passage. The critical cloture vote will happen on the 12-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon and the one-year anniversary of the Benghazi attack.

Another Democratic aide said the vote could happen sooner if Republicans waive certain procedural requirements.

--This report was updated at 9:45 p.m.