Obama, Biden meet with GOP senators on Syria

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"This evening, the president dropped by the dinner that the Vice President hosted for republican senators," the White House said in a statement. 

Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, were scheduled to host the senators for dinner as part of the White House's effort to win support for military action in Syria.

The president spent approximately an hour and 20 minutes with Biden and the senators.

The White House said Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamOvernight Defense: US blames ISIS for Turkey attack | Afghan visas in spending bill | Army rolls up its sleeves Senate panel passes bill that would create 4K visas for Afghans Trump: Rivals who don't back me shouldn't be allowed to run for office MORE (R-S.C.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsSenators press Obama education chief on reforms GOP senator: Trump endorsement could depend on VP Senate panel approves 0M for international climate fund MORE (R-Maine), Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissWyden hammers CIA chief over Senate spying Cruz is a liability Inside Paul Ryan’s brain trust MORE (R-Ga.), Bob CorkerBob CorkerSenate honors Tennessee coach Pat Summitt GOP senator: Something 'very, very good' can come from Brexit vote GOP senators: Brexit vote a wake-up call MORE (R-Tenn.), Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteClean energy group backs two GOP incumbents Senator calls for pause in accepting Syrian refugees after Istanbul attack GOP Senate super-PAC reserves M in airtime MORE (R-N.H.) and Deb FischerDeb FischerSenate sends pipeline safety bill to Obama McConnell warns of Friday work over defense bill US commander in Afghanistan finishing troop plan this week MORE (R-Neb.) attended the dinner. 

The Hill's latest whip list counts nine Senate Republicans as "yes/leaning yes" while 14 GOP senators are listed as "no/leaning no."

Ayotte, Chambliss, Corker and Graham are listed as "yes/leaning yes." Collins and Fischer are among 23 Senate Republicans listed as "undecided."

Earlier Sunday, White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonoughDenis McDonoughOvernight Defense: Benghazi report fallout | Nearly 50 dead after Istanbul attack Benghazi report: State worried about image of Marines marching through city Ryan secures big win with bipartisan Puerto Rico deal MORE said lawmakers would vote to authorize military strikes, despite mounting congressional opposition.

McDonough brushed aside the rising number of voices in Congress against military action, saying it was still “too early” to reach conclusions.

“This resolution is going to pass after we work this,” McDonough said on ABC’s “This Week.”

Obama will also conduct interviews with six television networks ahead of a primetime speech on Syria Tuesday night in an effort to win over lawmakers and the public.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidIowa poll: Clinton up 14 on Trump, Grassley in tight race with Dem Lynch meeting with Bill Clinton creates firestorm for email case The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-Nev.) filed the use-of-force resolution on the Senate floor Friday, setting up a Wednesday vote to end debate and move to final passage. The critical cloture vote will happen on the 12-year anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon and the one-year anniversary of the Benghazi attack.

Another Democratic aide said the vote could happen sooner if Republicans waive certain procedural requirements.

--This report was updated at 9:45 p.m.

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