Nevada governor pushes GOP ideals to avoid shutdown

Amid threats of another federal government shutdown, Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval (R) on Saturday touted Republican solutions while urging both sides of Congress to work together.

Sandoval says it is “no accident” that Republican governors lead states with thriving economies – “we reduce government, balance budgets, and keep taxes as low as possible,” he said.

After being elected in 2010, Sandoval said he eliminated about 600 positions within Nevada’s state government, merged agencies, put major regulations on hold for review and cut state spending by $500 million.

“Our founding fathers got it right. Free enterprise and limited government have made, and will continue to make, this country great,” he said. “We just need Washington to pause, reflect, and see what is possible in our great nation.”

But a senior official for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) jumped on the choice of Sandoval to speak for the party.

On Friday night, Kristen Orthman, the national press secretary for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), wrote on Twitter, “Do [Republicans] realize that they've tapped a GOP [governor] who is fully implementing ObamaCare to deliver their weekly address?”

Earlier that day, the House passed legislation to avoid a shutdown and to keep the government in operation until mid-December, but with the caveat that ObamaCare would be defunded. Democrats and Republicans argued over whether it was a genuine or purely political attempt at preventing a shutdown.

“Our message to the United States Senate is very simple: The American people don’t want the government shut down, and they don’t want ObamaCare,” Boehner said after the vote. “The House has listened to the American people. Now it’s time for the United States Senate to listen to them as well.”

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) says House Republicans’ real intent is clear: to shut down the government.

“It is a wolf in wolf's clothing,” she said.

In the GOP’s address, Sandoval expressed similarities between legislators in Nevada and those under the Capitol dome.

“Like Washington, Nevada has a politically divided government, but that hasn’t stopped our efforts to grow Nevada’s economy,” he said.

“Good executives, like all good leaders, must expect opposition when making decisions. Executives must engage those that disagree with them. They must listen to all ideas, persuade when possible, and respectfully and firmly disagree when necessary.”

The Republican governor did not specifically address the new healthcare law implementation in his speech, but he has worked to roll out two of its most important provisions: establishing Nevada’s health insurance exchange and expanding the state’s Medicaid program.

“When it comes to growing jobs, it is my responsibility to leave no stone unturned when it comes to getting Nevada working again. Can you just imagine what our economy would look like today if Washington would just take that approach?” Sandoval said Friday.