McCain: 'Dysfunctional' GOP helping Dems win ObamaCare battle

Sen. John McCainJohn McCainExperts warn weapons gap is shrinking between US, Russia and China McCain delivers his own foreign policy speech Republicans who vow to never back Trump MORE (R-Ariz.) said Friday the GOP has become a "dysfunctional" party that has spent more time infighting over ObamaCare than targeting Democrats who passed the law. 

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McCain blamed Sens. Ted CruzTed CruzPoll: Trump up by 15 points in Indiana Cruz: It’s ‘evident’ Trump has a problem with strong women Cruz dodges on support for Trump as nominee MORE (R-Texas) and Mike LeeMike LeeCruz: Boehner unleashed his ‘inner Trump’ Senate pressured to take up email privacy bill after overwhelming House vote House unanimously passes email privacy bill MORE (R-Utah.), the leaders of the movement to tie defunding of ObamaCare to the threat of a government shutdown, for driving wedges between Republicans. Both have appeared in ads attacking fellow GOP lawmakers. 

“We are dividing the Republican Party," McCain said on CBS. In his nearly 30 years in the Senate, McCain said he has never seen the infighting among members of his party so bad. 

“Rather than attacking Democrats and maybe trying to persuade those five or six Democrats that are leaning Republican, we are now launching attacks against Republicans funded by commercials that Sen. Lee and Sen. Cruz appear in.” 

McCain called the party dysfunctional ahead of a Senate vote to advance the House passed funding bill. Democrats are expected to strip the defunding of ObamaCare out of the bill Friday before sending it back to the lower chamber. 

“So it is very dysfunctional,” McCain said. 

“I think that it argues for us to be more united and spend our time against our adversary because we all share the same principles and values, and I’d like to see us do that,” he said. 

He avoided taking personal shots at Cruz, saying he had a good relationship with him.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee is blasting a number of red state Democratic senators Friday to vote against stripping the ObamaCare provision from a House-passed stopgap spending bill set to hit the Senate floor, according to CNN. 

They include Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay Hagan10 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2016 Senate Republicans are feeling the 'Trump effect' Washington's lobby firms riding high MORE (N.C.), Mark PryorMark PryorEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood Ex-Sen. Landrieu joins law and lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Mark BegichMark BegichEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Unable to ban Internet gambling, lawmakers try for moratorium Dem ex-lawmakers defend Schumer on Iran MORE (Alaska) and Mary LandrieuMary Landrieu oil is changing the world and Washington Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Republican announces bid for Vitter’s seat MORE (La.). They all hail from states that President Obama lost in last year’s presidential election. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenCarter pledges probe of sex assault testimony Pentagon looks to reduce billion energy bill Senate looks for easy wins amid 2016 gridlock MORE (D-N.H.) is also listed. 

Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioCruz wins bulk of delegate spots at Va. convention Trump seeks approval from foreign policy experts, but hits snags Many Republicans uninterested in being Trump’s VP: report MORE (R-Fla.), another leader in the fight, took to Fox News Thursday night to call out those vulnerable Democrats up for reelection. But he admitted that it is unlikely they would break with their own party. 

“It is realistic that it could be defunded if four Democrats, or five, change their mind,” Rubio said. “The problem is that they're so locked into it. You have Democrats, by the way, that are from states where [2012 Republican presidential candidate] Mitt Romney [won]. So I can tell you, ObamaCare is not popular in those states.”

Senate Democrats are poised to strip the ObamaCare language Friday and send the funding measure back to the House. The Senate version would fund the government through Nov. 15. 

It's unclear what would happen next. The government will shut down on Oct. 1 without a deal. 

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