Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (R-Ariz.) said Friday the GOP has become a "dysfunctional" party that has spent more time infighting over ObamaCare than targeting Democrats who passed the law. 

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McCain blamed Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day HHS official put on leave amid probe into social media posts Trump, Pence to address CPAC this week MORE (R-Texas) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework Prison sentencing bill advances over Sessions objections Grassley ‘incensed’ by Sessions criticism of proposed sentencing reform legislation MORE (R-Utah.), the leaders of the movement to tie defunding of ObamaCare to the threat of a government shutdown, for driving wedges between Republicans. Both have appeared in ads attacking fellow GOP lawmakers. 

“We are dividing the Republican Party," McCain said on CBS. In his nearly 30 years in the Senate, McCain said he has never seen the infighting among members of his party so bad. 

“Rather than attacking Democrats and maybe trying to persuade those five or six Democrats that are leaning Republican, we are now launching attacks against Republicans funded by commercials that Sen. Lee and Sen. Cruz appear in.” 

McCain called the party dysfunctional ahead of a Senate vote to advance the House passed funding bill. Democrats are expected to strip the defunding of ObamaCare out of the bill Friday before sending it back to the lower chamber. 

“So it is very dysfunctional,” McCain said. 

“I think that it argues for us to be more united and spend our time against our adversary because we all share the same principles and values, and I’d like to see us do that,” he said. 

He avoided taking personal shots at Cruz, saying he had a good relationship with him.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee is blasting a number of red state Democratic senators Friday to vote against stripping the ObamaCare provision from a House-passed stopgap spending bill set to hit the Senate floor, according to CNN. 

They include Democratic Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganPolitics is purple in North Carolina Democrats can win North Carolina just like Jimmy Carter did in 1976 North Carolina will be a big battleground state in 2020 MORE (N.C.), Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska) and Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuProject Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' MORE (La.). They all hail from states that President Obama lost in last year’s presidential election. Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOvernight Defense: VA chief won't resign | Dem wants probe into VA hacking claim | Trump official denies plan for 'bloody nose' N. Korea strike | General '100 percent' confident in US missile defense Trump official denies US planning 'bloody nose' strike on North Korea House Oversight Committee opens probe into sexual abuse of gymnasts MORE (D-N.H.) is also listed. 

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioColbert: Students taking action on gun violence 'give me hope' Lawmakers feel pressure on guns Florida lawmaker's aide fired after claiming shooting survivors were 'actors' MORE (R-Fla.), another leader in the fight, took to Fox News Thursday night to call out those vulnerable Democrats up for reelection. But he admitted that it is unlikely they would break with their own party. 

“It is realistic that it could be defunded if four Democrats, or five, change their mind,” Rubio said. “The problem is that they're so locked into it. You have Democrats, by the way, that are from states where [2012 Republican presidential candidate] Mitt Romney [won]. So I can tell you, ObamaCare is not popular in those states.”

Senate Democrats are poised to strip the ObamaCare language Friday and send the funding measure back to the House. The Senate version would fund the government through Nov. 15. 

It's unclear what would happen next. The government will shut down on Oct. 1 without a deal.