Forty-nine percent, on the other hand, say the signup for the healthcare law’s new insurance exchanges is not going well, according to a CBS News poll released Tuesday. 

The insurance exchanges, which launched Oct. 1, have taken a hit in recent weeks. Their website’s technical problems have overwhelmed peoples’ impression of the rollout. 

Overall views of the new program haven’t changed, though, since its unveiling in the beginning of October: 51 percent disapprove of the law, and 43 percent approve. 

The poll also touched on the aftermath of the government shutdown and debt debate that ended last Thursday. 

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Republicans and Democrats in Congress both received low job approval ratings, but the GOP has suffered the most. Eighteen percent of the public approves of Republicans’ jobs while 31 percent approve of Democrats’ performance.

The Tea Party, which made waves in the 2010 midterm elections, has also hit record lows in recent weeks. Only 14 percent in this latest poll hold a favorable view of the movement. 

Last week, Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Crying on TV doesn't qualify Kimmel to set nation's gun agenda Trump knocks ‘fake’ news coverage of his trip to Puerto Rico MORE (D-N.Y.) said the Tea Party has “peaked.” 

Sixty percent of people don’t think the Tea Party reflects the views of most Americans. Two of the likely GOP candidates for president in 2016 are members: Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong This week: Congress gets ball rolling on tax reform Week ahead: Senators work toward deal to fix ObamaCare markets MORE (R-Texas) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHouse bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Authorizing military force is necessary, but insufficient GOP feuds with outside group over analysis of tax framework MORE (R-Ky.). 

Only 11 percent of people are optimistic about Congress’s ability to deal with future issues affecting the country, the poll says. 

A number of House and Senate members from both sides of the aisle have been appointed to conference committees to negotiate a long-term deal on budget and debt limit issues over the next few months.