Clinton: Why don’t Biden, Kerry get same flak as me for Iraq vote?
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin Anti-Trump protests outside White House continue into fifth night Opera singers perform outside White House during fourth day of protests MORE asks why she is seen as a "divisive figure" over her past votes on the Iraq War while others escaped blame in her new book that examines her failed 2016 run for president.

In "What Happened," Clinton questions why other mainstream Democratic politicians haven't faced the same scrutiny over their 2003 support for the Iraq War, while Clinton herself was attacked over the vote by primary rival Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin Bernie Sanders tells Kansas crowd: This 'sure doesn’t look' like a GOP state The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and Congress at odds over Russia MORE (I-Vt.), The Washington Post reported in a review of the book.

“Why am I seen as such a divisive figure and, say, Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump and Congress at odds over Russia Trump: Biden would be ‘dream’ opponent ‘Street fighter’ Avenatti says he’s giving ‘serious thought’ to White House run MORE and John KerryJohn Forbes KerryKerry on Trump's Russia response: 'I don't buy his walk-back for one second' John Kerry: Trump 'surrendered lock, stock and barrel' to Putin's deceptions Get ready for summit with no agenda and calculated risks MORE aren’t?” she asks. “They’ve cast votes of all kinds, including some they regret, just like me? What makes me such a lightning rod for fury?"

"I’m really asking. I’m at a loss,” Clinton adds.

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During the campaign, Clinton's vote on the Iraq War was used against her as a sign of her "judgment" in tough situations. Former Vice President Joe Biden and former Secretary of State John Kerry also both voted for the war during their respective Senate terms.

Sanders initially questioned her judgment during the primaries, an attack that was echoed by then-candidate Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWSJ: Trump ignored advice to confront Putin over indictments Trump hotel charging Sean Spicer ,000 as book party venue Bernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin MORE during the general election. 

“Emails, bad judgment. Iraq, voted yes, bad judgment. Libya, bad judgment. All bad judgment," Trump said at a 2016 rally. “He said she suffers from bad judgment,” Trump said in 2016, referring to Sanders. “It's true.”

Clinton called the 2003 vote a "mistake" in a 2015 interview with reporters shortly after announcing her presidential run.

"I've made it very clear that I made a mistake, plain and simple, and I have written about it in my book. I’ve talked about it in the past," Clinton said at the time.