Former Vice President Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreAl Gore warns of 'ominous' record-breaking heat Colbert to Kennedy on retirement: Don't tell me your mind's going because 'you never had one!' Budowsky: Obama remains AWOL for Dems MORE will testify before a House panel this week on policies to address climate change.

Gore will appear before a subcommittee of the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Friday, testifying with former Virginia Sen. John Warner (R-Va.) in a hearing entitled "Bipartisan Leaders' Views on the ACES Legislation." ACES is the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009, legislation including cap-and-trade provisions as well as renewable energy standards and new "smart grid" technology.

Starting Tuesday, the subcommittee will hold four days of hearings on the legislation, proposed by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and Rep. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyHillicon Valley: Mueller indicts Russians for DNC hack | US officially lifts ZTE ban | AT&T CEO downplays merger challenge | Microsoft asks for rules on facial recognition technology | Dems want probe into smart TVs Dems push FTC to investigate smart TVs over privacy concerns Hillicon Valley: Hacker tried to sell military docs on dark web | Facebook fined over Cambridge Analytica | US closer to lifting ZTE ban | Trump, Obama lose followers in Twitter purge | DOJ weighs appeal on AT&T merger MORE (D-Mass.), who chairs the subcommittee.

Meanwhile, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will hold its own global warming hearing on Wednesday. Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryWill Democrats realize that Americans are tired of war? The Hill's Morning Report — Trump denigrates NATO allies, floats 4 percent solution Ex-CIA Director: NATO leaders should push back against Trump's 'reckless behavior' MORE (D-Mass.) will chair a hearing titled "Global Climate Change: United States Leadership For A New Global Agreement." Witnesses include Todd Stern, Special Envoy for Climate Change at the US State Department, as well as representatives from CARE, the Center for Clean Air Policy, and Siemens.

Mike Soraghan contributed to this report.