JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said in an interview on Friday that the Democratic Party does not have a strong candidate for the 2020 presidential election.

“The thing about the Democrats is they will not have a chance, in my opinion. They don’t have a strong centrist, pro-business, pro-free enterprise person," Dimon told Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business's "Wall Street Week."


"The American public is not clamoring for more government. They were angry about the Great Recession, they blamed banks, they blamed Washington, but they’re also angry about the bureaucracy,” he continued. 

Democrats are set to attempt to take back both chambers of Congress in 2018, while speculation swirls around a slew of potential candidates to take on President TrumpDonald John TrumpPoll: Both parties need to do more on drug prices Senate approves .3 trillion spending bill, sending to Trump White House: Trump will delay steel tariffs for EU, six countries MORE in 2020.

Figures such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersCongress to require FEC report on foreign money in elections DCCC adds first black candidates to list of top candidates Hillary Clinton’s sorry apology is why she’s no champion for women MORE (I-Vt.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSenate approves .3 trillion spending bill, sending to Trump Feinstein, Harris call for probe of ICE after employee resigns Senators introduced revised version of election cyber bill MORE (D-Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOvernight Health Care: House passes .3T omnibus | Bill boosts funds for NIH, opioid treatment | Senators spar over ObamaCare fix | 'Right to Try' bill heads to the Senate The Hill's 12:30 Report Booker admits defeat in Capitol snowball fight with Flake MORE (D-N.J.) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenWhite House would like to see Biden ‘in the boxing ring’ in 2020 Pence: I'd pick Trump over Biden in a fight John Dowd’s resignation sets Trump up for trouble in Mueller probe MORE have all been floated as possible contenders.

Dimon, who serves as the chairman of the Business Roundtable, said in November that Trump would likely be a one-term president. He has since said he regrets those comments.