A publication has obtained a recording of former President Obama’s address at a conference at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), despite attendees being barred from sharing the contents of the speech.

Reason published the recording of Obama’s speech on Monday, writing that “the most newsworthy thing about it is the simple fact that the public wasn't supposed to hear it.”

Those attending Obama’s speech at the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference (SSAC) on Friday, including media covering the event, were banned from publicly sharing information about the address.


“Following the panel, the sharing or reporting of its contents on public platforms, including social media, will not be permitted,” the notice sent to attendees read. “Those who fail to adhere to this policy will be subject to removal from the conference and denied tickets to future SSAC conferences.”

During the speech, Obama said his administration “didn’t have a scandal that embarrassed us.”

He said that while officials did make mistakes, there were no major controversies.

“I know that seems like a low bar," Obama added, in an apparent jab to the scandals surrounding President TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE’s administration.

"Generally speaking, you didn't hear about a lot of drama inside our White House," he said.

The Obama administration did face scrutiny for the "Fast and Furious" gun-tracking operation, as well as the IRS's targeting of Tea Party groups.

However, the Trump administration has faced a nearly constant deluge of questions surrounding officials and their actions since Trump took office more than a year ago. Trump's White House has seen the resignation or ouster of officials including his first chief of staff, spokesman, national security adviser, communications director, senior strategist, secretary of Health and Human Services and director of the Office of Government Ethics.