Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellThe Hill's 12:30 Report — NYT says Cohen taped Trump on payments | Trump floats tariffs on all Chinese imports | Russia open to new summit House Dem on inviting Putin to US: ‘He shouldn’t be in our country’ Dem on Putin coming to US: 'You don't invite the burglar to dinner' MORE (D-Calif.) said Monday that he doesn’t have faith in the bipartisan response to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE from being fired by President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff: Surveillance warrant docs show that Nunes memo 'misrepresented and distorted these applications' Chicago detention facility under investigation following allegations of abuse of migrant children Ex-Trump aide: Surveillance warrants are 'complete ignorance' and 'insanity' MORE, adding that “actions speak louder than tweets or words.”

“I want to see the bill on the floor and people having to say ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ ” Swalwell said on CNN while criticizing lawmakers for not advancing legislation to protect the Justice Department's Russia investigation from White House interference.

“Right now, it’s just talk and with this president, we know how he responds to just talk,” Swalwell said.

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“We need to put that bill on his desk and make him make a real decision rather than just benefiting from members saying what they are or are not going to do."

Swalwell said Congress must pass legislation Trump to understand the consequences he would face if he fired Mueller or Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinHillicon Valley: Trump's Russia moves demoralize his team | Congress drops effort to block ZTE deal | Rosenstein warns of foreign influence threat | AT&T's latest 5G plans The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and Congress at odds over Russia Rosenstein warns of growing cyber threat from Russia, other foreign actors MORE.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have expressed support for Mueller but a bill to protect him has stalled in the Senate Judiciary Committee, with a vote not expected until April 26. 

Sens. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisKey GOP senator says ‘no question’ Russia is meddling in U.S. affairs GOP Senator: 'Very inappropriate' for Trump to discuss allowing Russia to question US citizens Anti-Trump protesters hold candlelight vigil by White House MORE (R-N.C.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSunday shows preview: Questions linger over Trump-Putin summit Soccer ball Putin gifted to Trump gets routine security screening Graham: Biggest problem is Trump ‘believes meddling equals collusion’ MORE (R-S.C.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerKavanaugh returns questionnaire to Senate panel Booker calls on Kavanaugh to recuse himself on Trump-related cases Anti-Trump protesters hold candlelight vigil by White House MORE (D-N.J.) and Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsAnti-Trump protesters hold candlelight vigil by White House Hillicon Valley: EU hits Google with record B fine | Trump tries to clarify Russia remarks | Sinclair changing deal to win over FCC | Election security bill gets traction | Robocall firm exposed voter data Overnight Defense: More Trump drama over Russia | Appeals court rules against Trump on transgender ban | Boeing wins Air Force One contract | Military parade to reportedly cost M MORE (D-Del.) introduced legislation last week that would restrict Trump's ability to fire the special counsel.

Tillis slammed his colleagues who are blocking his bill, saying they would demand the same bill if Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhite House protests extend into sixth day despite rain Clinton: US is 'losing friends and allies' under Trump Justice Dept releases surveillance applications for former Trump aide MORE were president.