President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE said Friday that he will likely support a bipartisan bill, introduced by Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenAvenatti on 2020 campaign: 'The truth is my policy issue' Democrats embracing socialism is dangerous for America Lawrence O'Donnell: Secret Service could ‘physically remove’ Trump from White House when he loses in 2020 MORE (D-Mass.) and Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSenate GOP campaign arm asking Trump to endorse McSally in Arizona: report When it comes to drone tech, wildfire officials need the rights tools for the job Rubio slams Google over plans to unveil censored Chinese search engine MORE (R-Colo.), to allow states to regulate marijuana without federal interference.

"I support Sen. Gardner. I know exactly what he's doing," Trump told reporters. "We're looking at it. But I probably will end up supporting that, yes."

A day earlier, Garner and Warren, who both represent states with legal recreational marijuana, introduced the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States Act, in response to increasing opposition toward the substance from Trump's Department of Justice.

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The bipartisan bill would amend the Controlled Substances Act to include a framework that says it no longer applies to those following state, territory or tribal laws “relating to the manufacture, production, possession, distribution, dispensation, administration, or delivery of [marijuana]."

The two senators announced a partnership on the legislation in April in an effort to hold Trump to his word about favoring a states-rights approach to recreational pot, a position he voiced during the 2016 presidential race.

Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsHouston restaurant shuts down social media after Sessions photo backlash ACLU’s lawsuit may force Trump to stop granting asylum applications US judge rejects Russian company’s bid to dismiss Mueller charges MORE, a staunch opponent of marijuana legalization, in January rolled back the so-called Cole memo, which ordered U.S. attorneys in states where the substance has been legalized to deprioritize prosecution of marijuana-related cases.

Warren said the goal of the legislation is to “ensure that each state has the right to determine for itself the best approach to marijuana within its borders.”

Medical marijuana is legal in more than two dozen states and recreational marijuana is legal in nine states and Washington, D.C.