What better way to celebrate being arrested and watching a once-promising political career swirl down the tubes than with cake and candles? That's what Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich will do today, his 52nd birthday, which comes just one day after U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald said the two-term Democrat had gone on a "political corruption crime spree."

Blagojevich isn't the only politician to have an unfortunately-timed birthday this year. Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens (R) led on Election Night, but as the votes came in, the Senate's most senior Republican lost ground to Anchorage Mayor Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (D). On November 18, Stevens's 85th birthday, the Associated Press called the race for Begich.

Other officials might want to lay low on their own birthdays. Don't be surprised if you don't see Sens. Max BaucusMax BaucusTrump has yet to travel west as president Healthcare profiles in courage and cowardice OPINION | On Trump-Russia probe, don’t underestimate Sen. Chuck Grassley MORE (D-Mont.) and John KerryJohn KerryCongress needs to assert the war power against a dangerous president Sinclair and 'Big Media': The outrage that caused the outrage Tillerson sets a lost State Department on the right course MORE (D-Mass.) hanging around tomorrow, when they turn 67 and 65, respectively, or Reps. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) and Steve Kagen (D-Wisc.), who will be 57 and 59 on Friday.

None of the four impending birthday boys are under investigation, but this year, birthdays just don't seem to be a lucky day.

-Reid Wilson