Senators working on an energy and climate bill should take off the table provisions that expand offshore drilling, one Democratic senator suggested Monday.

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis Cardin Senate Dem hoping Pompeo now has 'greater appreciation' for balancing national security, civil rights Time for the Pentagon to create a system to better track its spending Trump, lawmakers cautious on North Korea signal MORE (D-Md.), a member of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico should force lawmakers to reconsider plans for expanded offshore exploration.

"What I hope is that the offshore drilling, along with the Atlantic and the Gulf, that area is off the table, and there's no expanded drilling in those areas," Cardin said during an appearance on the liberal Bill Press radio show.

Sens. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryBreitbart editor: Biden's son inked deal with Chinese government days after vice president’s trip State lawmakers pushing for carbon taxes aimed at the poor How America reached a 'What do you expect us to do' foreign policy MORE (D-Mass.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) had been working to craft a compromise energy and climate bill with Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate GOP: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed Cornyn: Hearing on McCabe firing would be 'appropriate' McCain: Mueller must be allowed to finish investigation 'unimpeded' MORE (R-S.C.) that would, among other things, allow increased oil and gas exploration in the Gulf and along the Atlantic coast in exchange for some of the bill's increased restrictions on emissions that contribute to climate change.

"I certainly hope it doesn't derail the bill," Cardin said of the oil spill's effect on the Kerry-Lieberman-Graham bill overall.

President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Stock market is in an election year: Will your vote impact your money? Trump will perpetuate bailouts by signing bank reform bill MORE's administration had been set to allow increased drilling before April's explosion on a BP rig, which resulted in a pipeline leak that has sent thousands of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The White House has said it won't approve new drilling projects until an investigation into the current incident is completed.

Not every senator is applauding the president's decision to pause new drilling, though. Sen. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterTrump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge Where is due process in all the sexual harassment allegations? Not the Senate's job to second-guess Alabama voters MORE (R-La.) urged the administration to press ahead with new exploration on Sunday.

Obama traveled to Louisiana on Sunday to survey the areas affected by the spill, which is considered one of the worst environmental disasters in the U.S. in years.