Senators working on an energy and climate bill should take off the table provisions that expand offshore drilling, one Democratic senator suggested Monday.

Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinDems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress Former New Mexico gov: Trump's foreign policy is getting 'criticized by everybody' Dems put hold on McFarland nomination over contradictory testimony: report MORE (D-Md.), a member of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said that the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico should force lawmakers to reconsider plans for expanded offshore exploration.

"What I hope is that the offshore drilling, along with the Atlantic and the Gulf, that area is off the table, and there's no expanded drilling in those areas," Cardin said during an appearance on the liberal Bill Press radio show.

Sens. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryLobbying world Kerry: Trump not pursuing 'smart' or 'clever' plan on North Korea Tillerson will not send high-ranking delegation to India with Ivanka Trump: report MORE (D-Mass.) and Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) had been working to craft a compromise energy and climate bill with Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration We are running out of time to protect Dreamers US trade deficit rises on record imports from China MORE (R-S.C.) that would, among other things, allow increased oil and gas exploration in the Gulf and along the Atlantic coast in exchange for some of the bill's increased restrictions on emissions that contribute to climate change.

"I certainly hope it doesn't derail the bill," Cardin said of the oil spill's effect on the Kerry-Lieberman-Graham bill overall.

President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaPatagonia files suit against Trump cuts to Utah monuments Former Dem Tenn. gov to launch Senate bid: report Eighth Franken accuser comes forward as Dems call for resignation MORE's administration had been set to allow increased drilling before April's explosion on a BP rig, which resulted in a pipeline leak that has sent thousands of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The White House has said it won't approve new drilling projects until an investigation into the current incident is completed.

Not every senator is applauding the president's decision to pause new drilling, though. Sen. David VitterDavid VitterThe Senate 'ethics' committee is a black hole where allegations die Questions loom over Franken ethics probe You're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat MORE (R-La.) urged the administration to press ahead with new exploration on Sunday.

Obama traveled to Louisiana on Sunday to survey the areas affected by the spill, which is considered one of the worst environmental disasters in the U.S. in years.