Pelosi: No question that voters are in an 'anti-incumbent' mood

On the heels of a top lawmaker's primary defeat this week, Pelosi said she's advised her members to work hard to court constituents.

"There's no question there is, at this moment, an anti-incumbent mood," the Speaker said at her weekly press conference.

Evidence of an anti-incumbent trend played out this past Tuesday when a state senator beat Rep. Alan Mollohan (D-W.Va.) in a Democratic primary. Utah Democrats also forced centrist Rep. Jim MathesonJames (Jim) David MathesonTrump EPA eases standards for coal ash disposal Utah redistricting reform measure likely to qualify for ballot Trump's budget targets affordable, reliable power MORE (D-Utah) into a primary next month.


On the other side of the Capitol, two incumbent Democrats, Sens. Blanche Lincoln (Ark.) and Arlen Specter (Pa.), are in danger of losing their primary races next Tuesday.

The anti-incumbent wave isn't limited to Democrats, either: Utah state GOP activists opted this weekend against renominating Sen. Bob Bennett (R-Utah) to run for a fourth term. In the Kentucky GOP primary race for the Seante seat being vacated by Sen. Jim Bunning (R-Ky.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump and Congress at odds over Russia GOP leader blocks resolution backing intelligence community on Russia Rand Paul blocks Sanders's Russia resolution, calls it 'crazy hatred' against Trump MORE leads a rival backed by Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi: 'Thug' Putin not welcome in Congress GOP to White House: End summit mystery Sunk judicial pick spills over into Supreme Court fight MORE (Ky.).

Pelosi said she's advised her members no differently than before.

"They have to work hard to be the best representative they can for their districts," the Speaker said, adding that she's told them to "assume nothing, but don't be dragged down by assumptions that may or may not apply to them."