DNC to reform primary system, cutting many 'superdelegates'

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) will reform its presidential nominating process to shorten the window of primaries and caucuses, and reduce the number of controversial "superdelegates," which dominated the 2008 process.

Gov. Tim Kaine (D), chairman of the DNC, established a special commission -- headed by House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) and Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) -- to reform the process that dragged out the primary battles between Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama.

According to the DNC, the commission will have three official goals: 1) changing the dates between which primaries and caucuses may be held, 2) reducing the number of superdelegates, and 3) improving the caucus system.

"This Commission will focus on reform that improves the presidential nominating process to put voters first and ensure that as many people as possible can participate," Kaine said in a statement. "I want to thank all the members of the Commission who have agreed to serve, including Congressman Clyburn and Senator McCaskill who have graciously agreed to serve as co-chairs."

The recommendations of the commission will be due by Jan. 1 of next year, and, Kaine said, it would work with the Republican National Committee (RNC) on some issues.