Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani (R) is back in the mix as he surfaced today to attack Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaHolder: DOJ, FBI should reject Trump's requests The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Frenzy over Kennedy retirement rumors | Trump challenges DOJ Asian American and Pacific Islander community will be critical to ensuring successful 2018 elections for Democrats MORE over national security. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainOvernight Defense: Pompeo lays out new Iran terms | Pentagon hints at more aggressive posture against Iran | House, Senate move on defense bill Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA Sarah Sanders: ‘Democrats are losing their war against women in the Trump administration’ MORE's campaign released a statement from Giuliani to further recent attacks on Obama for his support of U.S. court jurisdiction over terrorism suspects.

"Throughout this campaign, I have been very concerned that the Democrats want to take a step back to the failed policies that treated terrorism solely as a law enforcement matter rather than a clear and present danger," Giuliani said. "Barack Obama appears to believe that terrorists should be treated like criminals--a belief that underscores his fundamental lack of judgment regarding our national security. In a post 9/11 world, we need to remain on offense against the terrorist threat which seeks to destroy our very way of life."


Giuliani has been largely absent from campaign talk since McCain clinched the GOP nomination, taking a back seat in national attention to other former GOP presidential hopefuls. Pundits have debated former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's VP stock, and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee made waves by joking about Obama being shot at, but Giuliani has largely remained silent.


Today McCain utilized Giuliani as a leading conservative voice in national security. McCain has attacked Obama for a remark he made yesterday about suspected terrorists, calling the Illinois senator "naive."


Yesterday Obama said, "What we know is that, in previous terrorist attacks


Critics have said that Obama is wrong, and that one of those suspects escaped to Iraq after being interviewed by the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI).


Obama said Saturday he wants to make detainee rights, and the Supreme Court's latest decision on habeas corpus, a campaign issue. So far conservatives have responded to the challenge, attacking Obama throughout the day for his comment.