Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaChicago City Council approves Obama Presidential Center On North Korea, give Trump some credit The mainstream media — the lap dogs of the deep state and propaganda arm of the left MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMueller moves ahead with Papadopoulos sentencing What's wrong with the Democratic Party? Just look at California BBC: Ukraine paid Cohen 0K to set up talks with Trump MORE both released new TV ads today, and even as both campaigns have come to focus heavily on the economy in recent months, the candidates have stuck to the messages they created at the outset of the nomination race.

In Obama's ad, which will begin airing today in Pennsylvania, Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseySenators offer tax bill aimed at helping first responders McConnell: Midterms will be 'very challenging' for GOP Trump congratulates 'special guy' Barletta on win in Pennsylvania MORE (D-Pa.) addresses working-class frustration--an issue that has brought criticism to Obama over the past week.

Obama has come under criticism for a comment, made April 5 at a San Francisco fundraiser, about voter frustration: Obama said that working-class voters stick to divisive issues like religion and gun rights because they are "bitter." Casey says those frustrations are caused by economic downturn and political division, and that Obama can bring change and end political divisiveness--the central theme of Obama's campaign from the start.

Hillary Clinton, in a new ad for North Carolina, hearkens back to her original campaign slogan: "Let the conversation begin." In Clinton's early campaign stops, the New York senator offered "conversation" as an alternative to Bush administration policies, often talking about foreign policy and the war in Iraq, which she dubbed "irresponsible."

Clinton starts her new ad by saying "I told you I wanted to have a conversation," then proceeds to answer a voter's question on the economy. See the two ads below.

Obama's ad:

Clinton's ad: