Republicans look to capitalize on Romney's debate performance

Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, said it is "painfully clear" the president does not have the plan to cure the economy's ills.

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He sought to capitalize on Mitt Romney's strong debate performance Wednesday, saying the Republican nominee's faceoff with President Obama "crystallized" the choice facing voters. In the weekly GOP address, Priebus contended the president has come up short in his first four years, and does not deserve a second chance.

"Midway through the debate, I think the president realized that he's been president for the past four years, and it was his policies and his agenda that have failed to produce any of the results that he promised us as a candidate," he said. "President Obama simply hasn't shown the kind of leadership we need."

The president's reelection odds got a boost Friday when the Labor Department reported that the unemployment rate dipped to 7.8 percent in September, the lowest since Obama took office. But Priebus contended that the president's plan to raise taxes would eliminate the jobs the economy still needs.

Priebus also jabbed at the president for what he viewed as excessive campaigning. He pointed out that the president has not met with his Jobs Council since January, but has held 140 fundraisers since then. He also slammed the president for making a recent appearance on "The View," but not meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu when he was in the country.

"President Obama's focus has been on saving his own job," he argued.

Priebus touted what Mitt Romney could do for the nation, pointing to his business record and stint as Massachusetts governor. He vowed Romney would have a strong hand in international affairs, push further domestic energy production and cut taxes.

"How can we be sure that he can get the job done? It's simple. He has a record. And unlike President Obama's record, Mitt Romney's record is a record of success," he said.

Priebus also vowed Romney would continue to hold the upper hand in the remaining two debates.

"In the coming debates, the contrast will grow sharper and the choice, clearer. And if we want to do better than the last four years, well, there's only one choice to make. And that's Governor Mitt Romney," he said.