Tancredo: Obama and I are 'committed ideologues'

Former Congressman Tom Tancredo said Friday that he and President Obama are both committed ideologues willing to do anything to implement their vision for the country.

The difference, of course, is that Tancredo is dedicated to strict anti-illegal immigration ideology while Obama is a "socialist."

And while Obama has the ultimate bully pulpit to advance his ideas now, the former congressman said he will seek out ways to implement his agenda, including a possible run for governor of Colorado in 2010.

In an interview with the BBR, Tancredo said he believes he and Obama share the same dedication.

"The one thing I do admire about Obama," he said, "is he is a committed ideologue. He is a committed socialist. He'll do everything he can to bring about his view of what America should be. I have the same motivation."

When asked what that ideology is, Tancredo responded: "To advance the idea that the America I'm talking about is committed to the concept of the Constitution. It is a country in which the English language is the official language of the country. It is the thing that holds us all together."

Tancredo's remarks come following a 10-year career in the House and an unsuccessful bid for the GOP presidential nomination last year. That campaign focused primarily on stricter immigration laws, a cause for which Tancredo has become something of a national spokesman.

Recently, Tancredo was greeted by somewhat violent protesters at an appearance at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Tancredo was there to discuss his opposition to giving in-state tuition benefits to illegal immigrants. But before he could speak, protests broke out and something, perhaps a brick, was thrown threw the window of the room. (Check out video here)

But that specific issue, Tancredo said, wasn't at the root of the protests.

"These people are fascists, that's what they really are," he said. "They have a world view that is a lot different than mine and they don't want anyone stepping on their territory, their campus, to express a different opinion."

"The people there and the professors hate western civilization," he went on. "They hate America, at least the America that I love."

Tancredo said he will continue to seek out avenues to discuss these issues, including a return to Chapel Hill.

He also said that he is definitely still considering a run for governor in 2010. "Sure, I consider it. Absolutely," he said.

Tancredo has been rumored to be eyeing a run since last year. Democratic Gov. Bill Ritter will be seeking reelection and some Republicans say he hasn't lived up to his campaign promises. Some observers, however, have said the Democrats will likely hold onto the governorship.

If Tancredo does run, he may face a crowded field. Former Congressman Scott McInnis (R) is reportedly in the race and state Sen. Josh Penry (R) is also running.

Still, Tancredo said that he isn't set on running and would be happy to support a candidate who shares his views.

"My desire is not to be governor," he said. "My desire is to advance an agenda and where I can do that, I will."

jeremy.jacobs@thehill.com