New EPA sulfur regulations mean more pain at the pump

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According to an American Petroleum Institute study, reducing sulfur in fuel will cost refineries billions – costs that will be passed on to the consumer – and could cause the cost of gas to go up nearly 10 cents a gallon in some places. At a time when American families are already struggling to make ends meet, the last thing we need is another increase in gas prices. The study also found that if the EPA were to move forward with another discussed regulation known as the vapor reduction regulation, costs could rise as much as 25 cents per gallon. This is nonsensical. 

These burdensome regulations are even more harmful because of the administration’s unwillingness to pursue new sources of domestic energy that would ease the pain at the pump. We must work toward energy independence by pursing a true all-of-the-above energy policy.  We must pursue new supplies of available, affordable energy, including oil, natural gas, nuclear and coal. At the same time, we should continue to develop renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal. And while we’re at it, let’s approve the Keystone pipeline.

Seventy percent of Americans say they support building the Keystone XL pipeline—including 57 percent of Democrats. In fact, the Senate gave a strong endorsement to the deal by voting 78 to 20 in favor of the project.  Still, President Obama has yet to give this project the green light, opting to put the demands of environmentalists ahead of the needs of working Americans. While we must be good stewards of the environment, the Keystone pipeline has been thoroughly reviewed by the president’s own administration and proven to be environmentally sound. The pipeline would immediately create thousands of good-paying jobs and reduce our dependency on oil from unstable countries.

As an avid outdoorsman, I strongly believe that we should be good stewards of the environment. We should work together to make sure we conserve the world around us to leave for our children and grandchildren. With that said, we should make sure we’re making logical, economical investments in conservation, not causing more harm than good.

More oil isn’t the only answer to all of our energy problems, but neither are burdensome and costly regulations. I hope that President Obama and EPA will reconsider these misguided regulations and find ways to both help struggling American families and serve as good stewards of the environment. 

Roe is a member of the House Education and Workforce Committee.