The environmental impact can also be significant. An estimated 250 million pounds of unused medications are improperly disposed of each year. A 2008 Associated Press investigation discovered a wide array of pharmaceuticals detected in the drinking water supplies of 24 major metropolitan areas, affecting at least 41 million Americans.

Consumers can be excused for not knowing what to do with their expired or unused prescription drugs. For years, people were advised to flush their unused medications down the toilet. More recently, the recommendation shifted to combining the medicine with undesirable substances, like kitty litter or coffee grounds, and throwing it in the trash.  But that led to concerns that water contamination could still occur as sensitive material theoretically leaches out of landfills and enters underground water tables.

Balancing law enforcement and anti-drug abuse needs on the one hand with public health and environmental concerns in the other has been no easy task for Congress, the Drug Enforcement Administration and other state and local officials. As a result, local pharmacists and others trying to do the right thing encounter a wall of seemingly conflicting laws and regulations.

We’re proud of the hundreds of independent community pharmacies stepping up voluntarily to make the Dispose My Meds program a success. And we’re continuing to encourage more pharmacies to join the program and give patients additional disposal options (and hopefully a new appreciation for their local pharmacy). 

While drug disposal drives at community centers like fire or police stations are welcome, pharmacies are the optimal setting. That’s because it enables direct, real-time pharmacists counseling of patients regarding unused medications.

But we also recognize that this is only a start. We need a comprehensive approach to ensure appropriate medication use and disposal to keep patients healthier and communities safer.

Governments at all levels are increasingly getting into the act. Last year the D.C. City Council enacted legislation sponsored by Council members David Catania, Mary Cheh and Tommy Wells that requires the city’s Board of Pharmacy to develop a prescription drug disposal program with drop-off and mail-in options. The National Conference of State Legislatures says Maine and 12 other states have enacted or are considering legislation affecting pharmaceutical collection or disposal, according to the Associated Press. At the federal level, several bills have been introduced thanks to the leadership of notables like Senators Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinThe case for protecting America's intelligence agency whistleblowers Senate confirms Trump's first lower-court nominee Feinstein: Comey memos 'going to be turned over' MORE (D-CA), Charles GrassleyChuck GrassleyThe case for protecting America's intelligence agency whistleblowers Senate confirms Trump's first lower-court nominee Feinstein: Comey memos 'going to be turned over' MORE (R-IA), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), and Patty MurrayPatty MurraySenate Dems urge White House not to roll back free birth control rule Overnight Finance: Dems introduce minimum wage bill | Sanders clashes with Trump budget chief | Border tax proposal at death's door Sanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill MORE (D-WA) and Representatives Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerA unifying cause in Congress: animal protection House Dem seeks to create commission on 'presidential capacity' Medical marijuana supporters hopeful about government funding bill MORE (D-OR), Jay Inslee (D-WA), Jim MoranJim MoranTrump can help farmers by improving two-way trade with Cuba Former GOP House veterans panel chairman goes to K Street Former reps: Increase support to Ukraine to deter Russia MORE (D-VA), Lamar Smith (R-TX) and Bart Stupak (D-MI). 

Community pharmacists want to be constructive partners in designing such programs. We’ve suggested to policymakers that they follow this approach:


•       Make it easy on consumers – Patients need viable, convenient solutions when seeking to dispose of their unused medications. That means allowing for drop off at collection sites under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist as well pre-paid shipping envelopes.
•       Make the rules consistent, practical -- Current laws allow pharmacists to dispense controlled substances and to counsel patients about them, but criminalize the pharmacist who would take the drugs back for disposal. Guidance for patients can be just as counterintuitive. Authorities say flush some drugs down the toilet, but not others. The lack of clarity undermines safe and effective drug disposal.
•       Don’t overburden small pharmacies – Take-back programs should be voluntary for community pharmacies and there should be reasonable liability protections in place for participating pharmacies.
•       Identify new funding –While many pharmacists have admirably stepped up to voluntarily be part of the new Dispose My Meds campaign, they should not be required to finance a comprehensive, national program.
•       Effective outreach to consumers, stakeholders – The ambiguity and uncertainty described above makes effective education critical to ensuring maximum participation by all.

These are the building blocks to enable local pharmacists to help patients get the most out of their medications while making our communities safer and protecting the environment.