The Bush tax cuts are no place for compromise

The Republican Party is now in the history books for the largest swing of U.S. House seats since 1932, ironically the last time the country was in similar economic peril. However, this new majority doesn’t begin governing until 2011. Despite being completely repudiated by the American people, the Democrat controlled Congress is returning to Washington, DC this month to complete unfinished business. 

Regardless of the election day rout, the president maintains he  made the best choices while leading the country.   Savannah Guthrie of NBC News confronted the President during a post election press conference at the White House, “Would you still resist the notion that voters rejected the policy choices you made?” In non-answer answer, the president argued his policies were fine, but that their outcomes were unpopular. “Well, Savannah, I think that what I think is absolutely true is voters are not satisfied with the outcomes.” 

Using the president’s logic, the American people don’t really understand and, after all, it’s not the chef’s inability to cook, but the customer’s inability to think the food tastes good. It is not the big government design of the healthcare law that is flawed, it is the American people’s inability to understand how 159 new agencies and bureaus will lower the cost of their health insurance or perhaps they don’t understand how giving 50 percent of a bankrupt auto manufacturer to a labor union creates jobs.

So in short, says President Obama, I’m not the problem, it’s the American voter. 

Puzzled? You’re not alone. Fifty-four percent of voters expressed disapproval of the job President Obama is doing and “similar numbers said his policies will harm the country.”  

So what does President Obama’s repudiation on Election Day mean for the economy? At the top of the agenda is what to do about expiring tax relief. Extending tax relief is the first step this Congress should take to boost job creation in the economy.

Democrats often retort that extending tax relief costs too much money (but are conveniently not worried about borrowing more money from the Chinese when voting to waste $800 billion in economic stimulus for labor unions.) The election created a very clear mandate for the limited government, low tax wing of the Republican Party to govern. When Congress returns for its lame duck session, they should reduce spending to 2007 levels and use the money to maintain tax relief for all of the American people.         

Republicans should not worry if their actions result in a veto by President Obama. Instead they should speak with one voice, remind the president that allowing the people to keep more of their own money is the first step in returning to prosperity. If Republicans exercise their new mandate and insist that no new taxes are imposed on the American people, they offer their first effort to keep faith with the voters who spoke in volumes on Election Day. 

Dan Varroney is the Chief Operating officer for American Solutions, the citizen-action network founded by Speaker Newt Gingrich.