For America, Law of the Sea Treaty is a loss of sovereignty

ADVERTISEMENT
One cannot be assured that these bureaucracies will fight for the best interests of responsible international actors or of the sea itself. This is particularly troubling when keeping in mind the dubious track records of other U.N. commissions, such as allowing known human rights abusers to lead the U.N. Commission on Human Rights.
 
Across a number of Congresses, the United States has long resisted the restrictions that would be imposed by the Law of the Sea Treaty, and for good reasons. However, the current administration chooses to continue its pattern of ignoring sensible precedent. Instead, it is pressing the Senate to ratify international standards that would encourage encroachment by foreign actors, burden and constrain the U.S. Navy, and subject the United States to international judgments.
 
The U.S. House of Representatives recently adopted legislative language, which I wholeheartedly supported, that limits federal funding from being used by any institution or organization established by the Convention on the Law of the Sea. The U. S. Senate should follow the House of Representatives’ lead by rejecting any attempt to implement the Law of the Sea Treaty and sacrifice more of our country’s sovereignty.
 
Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-Fla.) is a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.