Foreign Policy

Magical thinking in America's Afghanistan

As the war in Afghanistan moves into its final stages, there are a growing number of news stories about the fraud and waste of the war in Afghanistan. Most of these focus on the wastefulness of aid spending, primarily through USAID. The focus on USAID is misleading, however.

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Libya's unfolding transformation

As political centrists take the lead in Libya’s historic election, many Westerners are drawing the premature conclusion that it marks a reversal in the regional Islamist tide which includes parliamentary victories in Egypt and Tunisia.

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Unfinished business of international justice

In her first month as the second Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), Fatou Bensouda is facing myriad challenges that threaten to undermine the slowly developing architecture of international justice. No obstacle is greater, arguably, than the primary Achilles heel of global accountability: the lack of a coherent or consistent strategy for apprehending war crimes suspects for whom international arrest warrants have been issued. In the absence of a global police force empowered to execute warrants issued by the ICC or other ad hoc tribunals, the key variable becomes whether capable states or multilateral entities are willing to take on this responsibility. Political will, therefore, is a wild card which has major impacts on each individual case.

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The business of doing good is good business

What do the world's largest beverage company and the leading organization devoted to helping children in America and around the globe have in common? A lot more than one would think. Both Save the Children and The Coca-Cola Company are committed to the belief that American leadership is a necessity in today's rapidly changing world.

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US should pressure nations to rescind anti-Ahmadiyya laws

On June 27, along with members of Congress and other guests, I heard a message of peace and freedom from the Ahmadiyya world leader, His Holiness Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, at a Capitol Hill reception co-sponsored by the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF), of which I am chair, and the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission.

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Investing in child nutrition helps secure their future

To build a strong house, we must begin with a foundation that can stand up to nature's challenges and the wear and tear of everyday life. Without that, no matter how well we build the rest, or how much we invest in it, the structure is compromised, and the house cannot provide reliable shelter.

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Ratification of 'Law of the Sea' advances world government

Ratification of the United Nations Law of the Sea Treaty (LOST) would be a giant step toward World Government. The principal purposes of LOST are to
transfer technology and wealth from developed to underdeveloped nations and to increase exposure to international litigation. Consider two quotations
from LOST's Preamble:

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Washington’s power play is endangering the lives of Iranian dissidents in Iraq

In the furious debate about Iran, let us not forget that there are lives at stake right now. Those who wish to appease the mullahs in Tehran must not be allowed to forget that thousands of innocent refugees are caught in the crossfire.
 
These refugees – there are 3,400 split between Camp Ashraf and Camp Liberty, in Iraq are literally facing massacre if the US would not carry out its commitments.

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Clearing Laos of U.S. bombs should be a high priority

On July 11, 2012, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton landed in Vientiane, the capital of Lao PDR, for a brief visit on her way to meetings of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in Cambodia. The last time an active U.S. Secretary of State stepped foot in the country was in 1955, during the Cold War. Nine years later, in 1964, the U.S. began a Secret War in Laos, unauthorized by Congress, to stem communist ground incursions and to interdict traffic along the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos. Between 1964 and 1973, the U.S. dropped the equivalent of one planeload of bombs every eight minutes, 24 hours a day, on a country the size of Minnesota. One ton of bombs was dropped for every man, woman, and child in Laos at the time, making it the most heavily bombed country per capita in history.

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Iran targets an American ally: Azerbaijan

News that the Iranian regime wanted to kill America’s ambassador to Azerbaijan in 2011 should not have come as a surprise to members of the U.S. Congress who have followed Tehran’s repeated attempts to undermine one of America’s most reliable allies in the broader Middle East. After spending a week in Baku, the vibrant capital of Azerbaijan, it has become very clear that the Iranian regime wants to overthrow this pro-western former Soviet republic on its northern border.

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