Foreign Policy

Syria: Why do we care?

Attacking Syria is truly historic; not necessarily the act, but the nonpartisan divide that has strangely united members of both parties.  There are strong opinions, with each offering credible positions.

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Moscow's mayoral race merits attention

With the Moscow mayoral election fast approaching on September 8, one burning question is, what should we take away from Alexey Navalny’s unprecedented campaign? On the pages of world publications, the “experts” more often than not proclaim that Navalny cannot win and nothing will change as long as Putin is in charge. Put another way, most of the commentary uses Navalny’s ambitious venture to underscore the conventional wisdom on Russian political life of the past decade.

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Education – A better way for the US to give foreign aid.

In 2000, the U.S. government and the international community committed to ensuring children everywhere would be enrolled in primary schooling by 2015. At the time, achieving universal primary education seemed a pretty lofty goal. But with less than 1000 days to go until the expiration of the Millennium Development Goals, the U.S. has the opportunity to ensure the best investment in fighting extreme poverty becomes a reality.

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Saudi Arabia must choose freedom

Last week, on August 26, Saudi Arabia’s appointed Shura Council approved legislation, which, if seriously implemented and applied, would provide historic protection against domestic violence in the Kingdom.

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Creative intervention in the political system will determine stability in Afghanistan

There is an urgent need for a creative intervention from Afghans within Afghanistan and our international allies to bring stability to the current crises and to secure the future of Afghanistan.  Holding elections does not constitute democracy or democratic practices.  Afghanistan is far from democracy with the current system.   What we have now is closer to  “organized autocratic anarchy.”  However, Afghans are hopeful despite all the serious challenges.

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Taking sides

The conflict of the day in the Middle East is the turmoil in Syria. The question to be confronted by the Congress in the next few days, is quite simply, which side are we on? The president has outlined a plan that would require our armed forces to punish the Assad regime, holders of the reins of government. This punishment has been decreed for their alleged killing of several hundred of the opposition forces, sometimes known as "The Rebels," for their opposition to the government.

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Let Taiwan join the ICAO

Uniting the global aviation community, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) will convene the 38th session of its triennial Assembly in Montréal from Sep 24 to Oct. 4.  ICAO's 191 Member States and a large number of international organizations are invited to the Assembly, which establishes the worldwide policy of the organization for the upcoming triennium. It is regrettable that Taiwan is barred.

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Limited intervention in Syria is an illusion

Having temporised for two years, President Obama is now impatient to intervene in Syria. He assures sceptics that it will be a limited intervention, a “shot across the bow” to deter Bashar Al-Assad from making renewed use of chemical weapons. But limited intervention is an illusion. Once the U.S. becomes involved, there can be no turning back. The strikes will generate their own complications – and pull the West into a wider conflict that could consume the region. This is why the British parliament on Thursday rejected David Cameron’s proposal for military intervention in Syria.

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Immigration must be high priority when Congress returns to Washington

As the August recess comes to a close, Members of Congress will soon be returning from their home districts with a slate of pressing issues to address; most prominent on the agenda are the Middle East, the national debt ceiling, and comprehensive immigration reform.  One of the few things that everybody in Washington unequivocally agrees upon, regardless of party, is that our immigration system is broken.

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