The Big Question: What happens next on healthcare?

Some of the nation's top political commentators, legislators and intellectuals offer their insight into the biggest question burning up the blogosphere today. .

Today's question:

After President Barack Obama's bipartisan summit, what happens next on healthcare reform?


Justin Raimondo, editorial director of Antiwar.com, said:

According to President Obama, Nancy Pelosi, and Harry Reid, the Democrats are going to move ahead without the Republicans -- so what's holding them back?

What's holding them back is that they don't want to "own" this boondoggle, and neither do the Republicans. While Big Pharma and the insurance companies are demanding their pound of flesh, and the Democrats feel compelled to deliver it to them, the voters -- remember them? -- are opposed, and that's what has the Obama-ites scared.

Furthermore, it isn't just the conservative voters who are opposed: a bill that makes it illegal not to buy health insurance isn't exactly a liberal-progressive proposal, either. The progressives wanted single-payer, remember, and so this Grand Compromise -- which only pleases the Democrats' corporate contributors -- alienates practically everyone.


Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, said:

Now the Democrats pass tax increases, more regulations and increased federal spending.  Obama’s promise not to tax anyone earning under $250,000 is a shattered fib.  The promise that you can keep your health insurance is a shattered fib.  The idea that costs will bend down is “no longer operative.”   Whatever Massachusetts was trying to tell the Democrats---forgotten. 
          
The Democrats own the city of Washington.  The Republicans own the countryside.
 
Why would the Democrats want to play anywhere other than in this city?
 
To paraphrase Bertolt Brecht….ignore the people…they might go away.



John Feehery, Pundits Blog Contributor, said:

They try to do reconciliation and discover they don't have the votes.  Then the whole thing collapses.  

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