Homeland Security

The DOJ safety scam

“We need to spend this money to keep you safe,” is becoming a more tiring cliché than, “It’s for the kids,” in American politics.

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More military base closure?

Military base closure is on the political agenda again, because the U.S. military budget is dropping sharply, from over $713 billion in fiscal year 2011 to around $513 billion in fiscal 2017, and all three services plan large force reductions. In response, Defense Secretary Hagel has called for another base closure and realignment commission (BRAC) round, but recently, two congressional sub-committees voted to prohibit the Defense Department from even planning for another BRAC. And even if there were another BRAC, it would probably close fewer bases than in previous rounds, as states and local communities have learned how to game the BRAC system, and have worked to “BRAC-proof” their bases. Alabama, Illinois, Mississippi, and Virginia already have projects underway to preserve their bases from future closure. BRAC critics argue that none of the previous five BRACs reached their targeted closure goals, and the promised savings from bases realigned as “joint bases” in the 2005 BRAC have not materialized either. Another BRAC is highly unlikely, for all these reasons.

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The whistleblower and the national security robber barons

National Security Administration whistleblower Edward Snowden fits the mold too well. By coming forward to journalist Glenn Greenwald and documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras, Snowden creates news and commands attention from Obama Administration, Congress, European Union, trading partners and citizens across the globe.

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A service in need

With the Pentagon feeling the pinch of sequestration, politicians on both sides of the aisle face legions of lobbyists seeking to have the cuts undone. Many high ranking civilian and military officials have rallied to defend their preferred service or program, claiming that keeping the cuts in place will ‘hollow out’ our armed forces. The Pentagon and its boosters know how to play Washington, but one key military service has been left out in the cold—the Coast Guard.

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End indefinite detention now

The recent Senate hearing on closing Guantanamo, under the leadership of Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), shed much needed light on the symbol of injustice and cruelty this prison has become.

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A fresh start on Guantanamo

The Senate will take a fresh look at the national security, financial and human rights costs of Guantanamo tomorrow at a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights.

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Fund JLENS, not the sequestration beast

On October 12, 2000, al Qaeda attacked the USS Cole in an Osama bin Laden-inspired plot.  It was a deadly lesson in the importance of providing commanders with the intelligence and equipment necessary to safeguard their forces.  As the folly of sequestration is proving, the national security of our nation is a casualty to the ongoing budget wars in Washington.  While the immediate impact of sequestration has proven to be muted, the real danger lies in its potential to increase the United States' vulnerability to attack.  Despite the investment of billions of taxpayer dollars, critical programs in development are being frozen in place or defunded at key milestones.  All of this is being done with no prioritization based on our future operational requirements. 

This is no way to defend a nation.

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Threats and opportunities in nuclear security spending

Soon after he came into office, President Obama pledged to secure all vulnerable nuclear materials around the world within four years. The President made great strides toward accomplishing this important goal, but his recently proposed cuts to nuclear security programs could jeopardize ongoing work to prevent nuclear terrorism. In its budget request for fiscal year 2014, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) cut $76.5 million for its program to secure nuclear materials, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). This represents more than a 15 percent reduction from GTRI’s pre-sequester annual budget.

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Blurring boundaries on national security: the government and private industry

As if out of a Hollywood movie, Edward Snowden emerged from hiding when he flew on commercial air from Hong Kong to Moscow in recent days, where he is now hunkered down in an airport transit zone and appears to be in legal limbo, having applied and withdrawn his request for political asylum from Russia. Snowden, the former NSA contractor reported to have leaked top secret material to the press detailing the government’s collection of “metadata” on Americans last month, is now officially on the run from U.S. authorities, since the U.S. filed criminal charges against him and requested his extradition, first from the Hong Kong government and now from Russia.

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Commit to ballistic missile defense

Without a clear plan for credible, effective, and affordable ballistic missile defense (BMD), the security of millions of Americans, our troops abroad and our allies is at risk.  The threats are clear and present.  Unfriendly nations like Iran continue to modernize their missile forces; North Korea already has the capability of reaching targets on the West Coast.  A simple freighter off our shores with a cheap missile and a low-yield nuclear warhead could create an electromagnetic pulse that would damage and destroy much of our electronic infrastructure, wreaking havoc in a society so highly dependent on technology.  To protect ourselves, the U.S. should commit to BMD and focus on providing a layered system of homeland defense which is flexible and which deploys proven technologies.

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