Judicial

If you’re going to meet with Merrick Garland

Slowly but surely, more Senate Republicans are agreeing to meet with President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Judge Merrick Garland. They’re right to do so, if for no other reasons than to show respect for Garland, the chief judge on the country’...

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Ending the decade long battle over special access reform

It’s no secret that Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler arrived on the job under the mantra of “competition, competition, competition.” And with accomplishments like the Open Internet order and the rejection of the merger...

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A Supreme Court above politics and above reproach

Eight Supreme Court justices took their seats last week to hear arguments on whether President Obama’s executive action on immigration is legal. While advocates hope Chief Justice John Roberts can wrangle a five-vote majority to their side, a...

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Torture is not the answer

Too little, and much too late. CIA Director John Brennan this week declared that the CIA would refuse to engage in waterboarding in the future, even if ordered to do so. This was the latest in a recent string of headline-grabbing proclamations...

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At the Supreme Court, the GOP doesn’t speak for me

Today, the Supreme Court will hear one of the most significant immigration cases in years. This case will shed light on the importance of having immigration policies that protect families, and it will shed light on the fact that no matter how our...

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Advocates ramp up the push for criminal justice reform

Lawmakers are returning to Congress with a very clear directive from constituents across the country: move forward with comprehensive, bipartisan criminal justice reform.

From Kentucky to Maine and Nevada to New Hampshire, we, along with...

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Government turns up the heat on the First Amendment

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson famously wrote that the “very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials.”...

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Mark Kirk leads by example

“I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States.” That language was put into place in 1789 by the very first Congress to fulfill the Constitution’s demand that members of Congress “shall be bound by Oath...

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