Politics

The Tea Party hates America

Let’s call a spade a spade.  There are people in this country, and I’m speaking specifically of the right-wing extremists who call themselves the Tea Party, who hate America.

Read More...

Bobby Jindal, not John Boehner, should be leader of GOP

Since the government shutdown nearly every pundit has come to the same conclusion: the GOP brand is damaged beyond repair. It doesn't get much worse than being likened to hostage takers and terrorists. CNN’s Candy Crowley even asked Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) if he would consider being anything other than a Republican (Paul laughed off the idea). But are they right? Is the GOP doomed? The answer depends on who leads the GOP. For the sake of the party, it’s time for Bobby Jindal to take charge.

Read More...

Let’s unify around commonsense solutions to reopen the government and avoid default

The objective of the misguided and irresponsible strategy of the Republicans in the House to shut down the government was to kill Obamacare. That strategy failed miserably. But it succeeded spectacularly in inflicting injury on the American people. And the collateral damage of this irresponsible and callous decision mounts every day.

Read More...

Basic civics is essential to resolving the gridlock

With the government shutdown in full effect, Americans, already estranged from Washington politics, are being further alienated by the mass confusion surrounding the government gridlock. Both parties, as well as the media, have only perpetuated a blame-game narrative that is hurtling the republic headlong towards a state of leadership paralysis.

Read More...

Election reform can counter political dysfunction

It has become painfully obvious that extreme partisanship in Washington is harming our economy, national security, and the future of our country.  The recent federal budget showdowns—and resulting risk to economic growth—are only the latest evidence.  While there is no one silver bullet, election reforms at the state level—including in Ohio—can improve on our national political dysfunction and reassure Ohioans and all Americans that our government can be restored to functionality.

Read More...

Government shutdowns have political consequences

On Thursday, Oct. 10, at exactly 12 midnight, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission became the latest casualty in the government-shutdown malaise gripping Washington. The nuclear agency closed its doors for the first time in U.S. history. While a skeletal crew remains to monitor the nation’s 100 nuclear reactors, regulatory efforts to prevent a meltdown (like what happened in Japan at the Fukushima plant) in the United States have ceased. This marks the latest in what has become a series of crucial government agencies that no longer provide much-needed services to the American people.

Read More...

Nullification is not politics as usual

In his just published autobiography, Fire and Ashes, Harvard professor Michael Ignatieff discusses the lessons learned from five years as a leader in the Liberal Party of Canada.

Read More...

Shutting down Washington: Opening a larger debate

Most Americans are unhappy about a government shutdown, with a new NBC/WSJ poll finding only 12 percent of voters who believe the nation is generally headed in the right direction. But here’s one silver lining in Washington’s current mess: seeing a shutdown in action should help reignite America’s centuries old debate about the appropriate size, functions and priorities of our federal government. The shutdown has already helped raise plenty of important questions for future policy debates.

Read More...

President Obama must go all in

President Obama’s administration has largely been a disappointment to his progressive base.  This appears to be true not only to his liberal critics, but to the president himself.  He has lost every major budget battle during his tenure.  Indeed, the Senate’s own Continuing Resolution is just 2 percent above Rep. Paul Ryan’s (R-Wis.) proposed 2014 budget.  Yet, despite the major concessions Obama has made, he now faces a full-scale revolt.

Read More...

Entitlement reform must be part of the deal

President Obama’s description of what it means to not increase the debt limit is disingenuous. Here’s what he said at his October 8 press conference: “…raising the debt ceiling is a lousy name… it does not increase our debt. It does not grow our deficit, it does not allow for a single dime of increased spending. All it does is (to) allow the Treasury Department to pay for what Congress has already spent.”

Read More...

Pages