Apple's missed opportunities for alliances with government and academia

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Apple has simply missed the opportunity to gain valuable alliances in government, academia and corporate America unfortunately. Apple has always been reluctant to offer any type of significant discount to organizations looking to make the switch to Apple. In 2010, Android smartphones had virtually no market share in the corporate world but by 2012 they had attained a 34% adoption rate by businesses. According to Gartner, that rate will increase to 56% by 2014. According to Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield and Byers, the Android adoption rate in businesses is six times that of iPhones.

Apple’s uncompromising pricing policy has also hurt consumer sales for the iPhone. Many carriers have been disgruntled with the pricing structure offered by Apple and have chosen to push more lucrative lines – especially the Samsung Galaxy S III. Apple’s litigious response to Samsung has done little to dampen consumer demand.

For many years, consumers were spoiled with new devices being unveiled by Steve Jobs -- an iPod one year, an iMac another year, Apple TV, the iPad and the list goes on. Nevertheless, it has been quite some time since Apple unveiled a new device. Rather, the company has decided to release new versions of the same devices. In many cases, consumers see very little difference between the iPad 2 and the iPad 3 or the iPhone 4S and the iPhone 5 and Apple has been punished for this.

Finally, Apple has been tremendously successful since the significant injection of capital by Microsoft. Its success has been remarkable, it has created thousands of jobs and left an indelible mark on our society. The company may have charged premium pricing for many years but consumers know that they have been provided with premium products with superior customer support and very often a superior consumer experience.

Hayes is a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York. A former investment banker, Hayes began his career in the financial services industry with Cantor Fitzgerald at the World Trade Center.