Technology

Digital trade in a post-PRISM world

While much ink has been spilled already on the implications of the National Security Agency’s mass electronic surveillance programs for privacy, civil liberties, and national security, the fallout from PRISM is also likely to have an immediate and lasting negative impact on U.S. economic competitiveness. Not only are the few U.S. companies named on Edward Snowden’s leaked slides suffering reputational harm among consumers around the world because of their court-ordered compliance with government surveillance activities, but entire U.S. industries are facing increased threat of a global backlash from customers who may choose to flee to foreign competitors who are perceived, rightly or wrongly, as keeping data safe from government monitoring. While these threats are most severe to the U.S. technology sector, they extend to many other U.S. industries that handle sensitive information, such as banking, insurance, and health care.

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Broadcast spectrum is not the only spectrum available

The U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee is holding an oversight hearing this week to examine the Federal Communications Commission’s progress in planning its upcoming spectrum incentive auction.  The Commission expects the auction to contribute 120 MHz of broadcast spectrum to the goal of an additional 300 MHz for mobile broadband by 2015 established by the FCC’s National Broadband Plan.

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The cable industry – what we don’t see on TV every day

Today we know cable as that essential amenity in our home that keeps us laughing, captivated and informed. It’s the way in which we learn about diverse cultures and people, whether by watching a novela hoping to learn a bit of Spanish, or by watching the Travel Channel to learn about distant lands. But behind the television screen and numerous reality shows that feature the lives of celebrities here in my home state of California exists an industry that stands for so much more than what we see on TV.

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Consumers and first responders demand successful spectrum auctions

As America’s mobile innovators feverishly invest tens of billions of dollars in next-generation network infrastructure, and scramble in the meantime to swap, sell and merge broadband assets to meet the skyrocketing demand of consumers for all things wireless, this week’s House Telecom hearing – “Oversight of Incentive Auction Implementation” – is an encouraging signal that when it comes to spectrum, Congress, too, is doing its part to ensure our nation, our economy, and our citizens will not be left short-changed when it comes to our nation’s spectrum requirements.

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A competitive wireless market Is good for business and consumers

Tomorrow, the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s  Subcommittee on Communications and Technology will conduct a public hearing on the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) upcoming auction of valuable low-band spectrum currently used by television broadcasters, also known as the “incentive auction.”  In a very real way this auction has the potential to determine the future of the wireless marketplace.  It will have a sizeable impact on consumers’ ability to receive innovative services at affordable prices, and its revenues will help fund an advanced communications network for our nation’s first responders.

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Surf and turf wars in Silicon Valley

At first blush, the event held by Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy entitled “The Broadband Technology Explosion: Rethinking Communications Policy for a Mobile Broadband World” could have easily seemed like a wonk fest for public policy nerds.

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GAO report on economic impact from IP theft underwhelms

On Tuesday, July 9, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released testimony it provided to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations regarding Insights Gained from Efforts to Quantify the Effects of Counterfeit and Pirated Goods in the U.S. Economy. While the testimony did attest to the importance of intellectual property (IP) to the U.S. economy and did point to the challenges inherent in producing accurate estimates of the impact of counterfeit and pirated goods, it was rather surprising that the testimony did not point to the valiant work of organizations like the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) and the IP Commission report to do precisely that.

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Promoting US invention; Aiming high in innovation

Twenty-five years ago, almost to the day, engineers from a small Silicon Valley start-up filed their first patent application.  Patent No. 5,088,032, entitled “Method and apparatus for routing communications among computer networks,” was ultimately issued in 1992, and provided foundational capability for the interior gateway routing that enables the Internet as we know it.  The company was Cisco, which this month becomes one of only a handful of American companies to be awarded its 10,000th U.S. patent.

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Banning bidders from spectrum auctions doesn’t make sense

Making government policy is not like Little League soccer. Robust competition is a hallmark of our nation, but giving everybody a chance to play shouldn’t mean keeping the most capable players off the field when we need them most.  As the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) develops the rules for upcoming spectrum auctions, including the big telecom players will raise the most money and allocate much-needed spectrum to its most efficient uses.

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