The Senate approved a five-month extension of federal unemployment benefits on Monday in a 59-38 vote that saw six Republicans break ranks and vote in favor of the legislation.
 
The bill now goes to the House, where Senior House Republicans have felt little pressure to act on jobless benefits. Although they won’t say so directly, they are likely to ignore the Senate bill.
 

ADVERTISEMENT
Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerLobbyists bounce back under Trump Business groups silent on Trump's Ex-Im nominee Chaffetz won't run for reelection MORE (R-Ohio) has suggested the retroactive plan would be difficult to implement, and he said its lack of job-creation measures means it has fallen short of the requirements he set in December for considering an extension of long-term unemployment insurance.
 
Senate Democrats are hoping their passage of the bill will raise the pressure on BoehnerJohn BoehnerLobbyists bounce back under Trump Business groups silent on Trump's Ex-Im nominee Chaffetz won't run for reelection MORE.
 
“If our bill was put up for a vote in the House, there is no question it would pass,” Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles SchumerCruz: 'Schumer and the Democrats want a shutdown' GOP fundraiser enters crowded primary for Pa. Senate seat Dems: Trump risks government shutdown over border wall MORE (D-N.Y.) said ahead of Monday’s vote. “The House needs to extend unemployment benefits to millions of Americans right now, without attaching extraneous issues that are merely an attempt to score political points.”
 
Six Republicans helped Democrats clear Senate hurdles on the legislation.
 
Sens. Dean HellerDean HellerOvernight Energy: Trump orders review of national monuments, claiming ‘egregious abuse’ Draft House bill ignites new Yucca Mountain fight Ex-Nevada state treasurer may challenge Heller in 2018 MORE (R-Nev.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsOvernight Energy: Lawmakers work toward deal on miners’ benefits Schumer: Senate Russia probe moving too slowly Collins: I'm not working with Freedom Caucus chairman on healthcare MORE (R-Maine), Mark KirkMark KirkThe way forward on the Iran nuclear deal under President Trump ObamaCare repeal bill would defund Planned Parenthood Leaked ObamaCare bill would defund Planned Parenthood MORE (R-Ill.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa MurkowskiTrump’s Army pick faces tough confirmation fight Republican Sen. Collins considering run for Maine governor in 2018 Alaska senators push bill to allow Arctic drilling MORE (R-Alaska), Rob PortmanRob PortmanTrump tax plan prompts GOP fears about deficit Overnight Regulation: Senators call for 'cost-effective' regs | FCC chief unveils plans to roll back net neutrality Senators push 'cost-effective' reg reform MORE (R-Ohio) and Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteBottom Line How Gorsuch's confirmation shapes the next Supreme Court battle THE MEMO: Trump set to notch needed win with Gorsuch MORE (R-N.H.) voted for the unemployment insurance (UI) extension.
 
After the vote, a spokesman for Boehner reiterated his opposition.  
 
“As the Speaker said months ago, we are willing to look at extending emergency unemployment insurance as long as it includes provisions to help create more private-sector jobs – but, last week, Senate Democratic leaders ruled out adding any jobs measures at all,” Boehner spokesman Michael Steel said. “The American people are still asking, ‘where are the jobs?’ and House Republicans are focused on our jobs agenda for families and small businesses.”
 
Yet there are a handful of House Republicans, mainly from the Northeast, who do want the party to act, and upon passage of the Senate measure they released a letter to their leadership calling for a vote in the House.
 
“As many Americans continue to struggle without benefits, we respectfully request that the House immediately consider this bill or a similar measure to restore unemployment benefits to struggling Americans,” wrote the lawmakers, who were led by Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.). Other signatories on the letter were Reps. Peter King (N.Y.), Jon Runyan (N.J.), Chris Smith (N.J.), Chris Gibson (N.Y.), Michael Grimm (N.Y.) and Joe Heck (Nev.).

The White House said Monday that none of the current job-creation proposals being floated by House Republican leaders had a chance of passing in the Senate. A senior administration official said that while the White House was willing to have a conversation about changes to the bill, the White House would not participate in hostage negotiations on issues like the Keystone XL pipeline or changes to ObamaCare.

The unemployment extension co-sponsored by Sens. Jack ReedJack ReedSunday shows preview: McMaster hits circuit for second straight week The Hill's 12:30 Report Easy accessibility of voter registration data imperils American safety MORE (D-R.I.) and Heller and would provide retroactive benefits to more than 2 million people who lost their federal unemployment benefits after the program expired on Dec. 28.
 
Senate Republicans blocked three previous attempts to extend the benefits, but this time, the legislation had five Republican co-sponsors, making passage certain.
 
The Senate measure would use several offsets to pay for the nearly $10 billion cost of the measure, including pension smoothing provisions from the 2012 highway bill, which were set to phase out this year, and extending customs user fees through 2024.
 
The Senate deal also includes an additional offset allowing single-employer pension plans to prepay their flat rate premiums to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. (PBGC).
 
The measure would prevent millionaires and billionaires from receiving the federal benefits.
 
The proposal also includes language to strengthen re-employment and eligibility assessment and re-employment services programs, which provide help to unemployed workers, when they enter their 27th week of benefits.
 
But many Republicans still opposed the bill because they weren’t able to add “job-creating” amendments such as legislation to repeal parts of ObamaCare, approve construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, enforce the E-verify system and stop Environmental Protection Agency regulations.
 
The emergency federal program kicks in once workers who have continued looking for a new job exhaust their state-level benefits, usually after 26 weeks.