Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallOvernight Regulation: Pro-regulatory groups sound alarm over Trump budget Dem senator: Confirm Gorsuch, Garland simultaneously Dem 2020 hopefuls lead pack in opposing Trump Cabinet picks MORE (D-N.M.) on Tuesday became the latest Senate Democrat to back a legislative fix to ObamaCare that would let people keep their health insurance plan if they like it.

Udall signed up as a co-sponsor to the Keeping the Affordable Care Act Promise Act, S. 1642. That bill would allow insurance companies to keep offering insurance plans that would otherwise have to be canceled because they fail to meet new standards under ObamaCare.

ADVERTISEMENT
Udall joined the bill without issuing a formal statement, but Senate Democrats are becoming increasingly vocal about the need to change the law. When Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuFive unanswered questions after Trump's upset victory Pavlich: O’Keefe a true journalist Trump’s implosion could cost GOP in Louisiana Senate race MORE (D-La.) introduced the bill earlier this month, she said Democrats need to pass legislation to make good on their promise that Americans could keep their health insurance if they like it.

"We said to people that if they have insurance they like, they can keep it," Landrieu said. "We didn't say that if they have insurance they like that doesn't meet the standards or that meets the minimum standards, they can keep it."

Last week, President Obama announced an administrative fix to the bill that allows state insurance commissioners to continue offering those plans that are due for cancellation for another year. But that led to criticism from some insurance companies that said it would be too difficult to reverse course at the last minute and continue these plans.

In addition, some state commissioners have said they would not use this flexibility offered by Obama. That would appear to mean that people in those states would not be allowed to keep their preferred insurance, contrary to Obama's "keep your health plan" promise.

The addition of Udall to the bill only puts more pressure on Senate Democrats to allow a vote on the measure. But so far, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidSanders and Schumer are right: Ellison for DNC chair The Hill's 12:30 Report Hopes rise for law to expand access to experimental drugs MORE (D-Nev.) has not said anything about a vote.

Last week, the House passed a similar measure and had the help of 39 Democrats.

Just yesterday, Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinDem 2020 hopefuls lead pack in opposing Trump Cabinet picks Manchin: Sanders backers should challenge me in Dem primary Greens launch ads against two GOP senators for Pruitt votes MORE (D-W.Va.), kept up the pressure for a legislative fix by saying the Obama administration "messed up royally" with the rollout.

Most of the supporters of the legislative fix are up for reelection in 2014: Landrieu herself, plus Sens. Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (D-N.C.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyDem 2020 hopefuls lead pack in opposing Trump Cabinet picks Poll: Senate should confirm Gorsuch A guide to the committees: Senate MORE (D-Ore.), Mark PryorMark PryorCotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood MORE (D-Ark.), and Udall.

Other Senate co-sponsors are Manchin and Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinA guide to the committees: Senate Dem: Trump's China trademark looks like a quid pro quo Senate advances Trump's Commerce pick MORE (D-Calif.) and Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellyThe DNC in the age of Trump: 5 things the new chairman needs to do Poll: Senate should confirm Gorsuch A guide to the committees: Senate MORE (D-Ind.) — these three senators don't face reelection until 2018.