More than 400 amendments filed to House 2011 spending measure

More than 400 amendments have been filed to the House GOP bill funding the government for 2011.

The amendments include proposals to defund last year's healthcare law, prevent federal employees from flying first-class and prohibit the Defense Department's sponsorship of NASCAR. The House is set to begin sorting through the amendments on Tuesday.

GOP leaders are allowing unlimited amendments on the floor for the continuing resolution to fund the government through the end of September. The measure would reduce current spending by $61 billion.

Lawmakers have until the House adjourns on Tuesday to file amendments to the measure.

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The House Rules Committee released the list of amendments filed so far early Tuesday morning, although not all amendments are expected to be considered. GOP leaders would like to have a vote on the underlying bill on Thursday.

They anticipate late night and early morning votes on Tuesday and Wednesday as members work through the long list of amendments.

Scores of amendments would adjust spending levels for various programs. Many amendments from Democrats would limit spending in the Defense Department or research for various military aircraft, while many from Republicans would limit spending in the Environmental Protection Agency or Department of Energy.

A quick read of the list shows that other amendments would:

Block money to Planned Parenthood; block travel expenses for the secretaries of Treasury and Housing and Urban Development; block foreign aid to Saudi Arabia, Russia and China; prevent funding for improvements to the White House; end subsidies to oil companies; block implementation of cap-and-trade, prevent pay raises for federal employees; stop all dues payments to the United Nations; and even prevent any money from being spent in the immigration case United States of America v. The State of Arizona and Janice K. Brewer.

The House returns at 10 a.m. Tuesday morning, and is expected to begin an hour of debate on H.R. 1 around noon, and then begin looking at amendments.