Shimkus was accompanied on his visit by Reps. Gene GreenRaymond (Gene) Eugene GreenOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Key ObamaCare groups in limbo | Opioids sending thousands of kids into foster care | House passes bill allowing Medicaid to pay for opioid treatments On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Trump officials move to expand non-ObamaCare health plans | 'Zero tolerance' policy stirs fears in health community | New ObamaCare repeal plan MORE (D-Texas) and Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessTrump signs 'right to try' drug bill House approves 'right to try,' sends bill to Trump's desk Overnight Health Care: New allegations against VA nominee | Dems worry House moving too fast on opioid bills | HHS chief back in DC | FDA reexamines safety of controversial Parkinson's drug MORE (R-Texas), both members of the Energy & Commerce Committee.

In comments to the Carmi Times, Shimkus said Yucca Mountain was closed for "no apparent scientific or technical reasons," and said the site is needed to consolidate nuclear waste.

"There are over 120 storage pools scattered around the country," he said. "We need to proceed with a consolidated site, and one site has been in the works for years."

Shimkus also implied Republicans could make the Yucca Mountain issue into a jobs issue by saying that people living closest to the site "want to see Yucca move forward," and that they have seen job losses since the site was shut down by the Obama administration.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.) has worked to keep the site closed, despite billions of dollars spent over the last three decades to prepare the site as a disposal facility for radioactive waste.