On the other side of the political aisle, Democrats this week continued to further regulate producers of sunscreen by pressing for new labeling rules. A small group of Senate Democrats wrote to the Food and Drug Administration calling on the FDA to release a final rule that would require sunscreen products to include information on how well they protect against UVA rays, which can penetrate the skin more deeply than UVB rays.

"When will consumers be able to purchase sunscreen products that meet the new standards?" the senators wrote. "In the meantime, what is the agency doing to ensure that consumers are not purchasing products that do not actually offer the advertised level of protection?"

The Senate letter was led by Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedSenate panel again looks to force Trump’s hand on cyber warfare strategy Overnight Defense: Pompeo lays out new Iran terms | Pentagon hints at more aggressive posture against Iran | House, Senate move on defense bill Defense bill moves forward with lawmakers thinking about McCain MORE (D-RI), and signed by Sens. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinDem Senator open to bid from the left in 2020 Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Trump should require federal contractors to follow the law MORE, (D-Iowa), Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis Schumer'Right to try' is a win for patient rights and President Trump Overnight Finance: White House planning new tax cut proposal this summer | Schumer wants Congress to block reported ZTE deal | Tech scrambles to comply with new data rules OPEC and Russia may raise oil output under pressure from Trump MORE (D-NY), Pat Leahy (D-Vt.), John KerryJohn Forbes KerryJohn Kerry to NYU Abu Dhabi: We can't address world problems by 'going it alone' Juan Williams: Trump's dangerous lies on Iran Pompeo: US tried, failed to achieve side deal with European allies MORE (D-Mass.), and Kirsten Gilibrand (D-NY).

Reed, Schumer, Leahy and Kerry have also sponsored legislation that would require FDA's 2007 draft rule on sunscreen labeling to take effect automatically if the FDA does not finalize it within six months.