Marijuana amendment adopted
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The House early Friday adopted Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherMueller grand jury to question Flynn associate: report GOP lawmaker says FBI seeking interview about Assange meeting Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE's (R-Calif.) proposal to bar the Justice Department from preventing states' implementation of their own medical marijuana laws.

Adopted 219-189, Rohrabacher's measure was offered as an amendment to a 2015 appropriations bill to fund the Justice Department, Commerce Department and science programs. It would apply to the 33 states that allow the use or possession of medical marjiuana.

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Rohrabacher said that his amendment would reflect shifting public opinion toward the use of medical marijuana and limit federal overreach.

"Despite this overwhelming shift in public opinion, the federal government continues its hard line of oppression against medical marijuana," Rohrabacher said. 

The amendment attracted the support of a bipartisan coalition in favor of legalized marijuana.

"This train has already left the station," said Rep. Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerDemocrat: Pelosi ‘ceded the moral high ground’ on sexual harassment Clyburn on disparity in responses to sexual allegations: ‘Who elected them?’ Third House Dem calls for Conyers to resign MORE (D-Ore.), whose state allows the use of medical marijuana. "The problem is that the federal government's getting in the way."

But other lawmakers argued that states shouldn't be encouraged to promote what has long been an illegal drug in the United States.

"This will take the away the ability of the Department of Justice to protect our young people," said Rep. John FlemingJohn FlemingCoast Guard suspends search for missing Ohio plane Freedom Caucus member to bring up bill on impeaching IRS chief GOP seeks to make it 52 MORE (R-La.).

Rep. Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisMcConnell PAC demands Moore return its money The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill GOP predicts few defections on tax vote MORE (R-Md.), a former physician, said that other addictive drugs proven to help with certain health problems weren't being promoted the same way as marijuana. He cited an example that nicotine, an ingredient in cigarettes, has been proven to help certain types of epilepsy.

"Why don't we have therapeutic tobacco?" Harris said. "Nobody writes a prescription and says, 'Smoke a couple of cigarettes and cure your epilepsy.' But that's what we're being asked to do."