Five House Republicans defected from their ranks on the Wednesday vote to authorize the party's lawsuit against President Obama.

Reps. Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (Ga.), Scott GarrettErnest (Scott) Scott GarrettTrump taps USTR's Gerrish as acting head of Export-Import Bank Frustrated execs clamor for action on bank nominees Manufacturers ramp up pressure on Senate to fill Ex-Im Bank board MORE (N.J.), Walter JonesWalter Beaman JonesGOP revolts multiply against retiring Ryan The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by CVS Health - A pivotal day for House Republicans on immigration White House scraps daily internal communications meeting after McCain remarks MORE (N.C.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieHillicon Valley: House Dems release Russia-linked Facebook ads | Bill would block feds from mandating encryption 'back doors' | AT&T hired Cohen for advice on Time Warner merger | FCC hands down record robocall fine | White House launches AI panel Congress can level the playing field for small farmers Lawmakers move to block government from ordering digital ‘back doors’ MORE (Ky.) and Steve StockmanStephen (Steve) Ernest StockmanFormer Texas congressman found guilty of 23 felonies Trump's right — to prevent gun violence, don't disarm our military What Stoneman Douglas activists can learn from Bill Clinton’s assault weapons ban MORE (Texas) all voted against the resolution authorizing the GOP lawsuit against the president for his use of executive power.

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Broun, Stockman and Jones have all indicated support for impeaching President Obama. Jones told The Hill he didn't think the lawsuit went far enough.

A Broun spokeswoman said he voted against the bill because he didn't think it would truly help limit President Obama's executive power.

"Dr. Broun believes that this legislation – while well-intentioned – is doomed for death in the Senate. As a result, he would rather see House leadership work towards practical solutions which would shrink the size and scope of government and cut wasteful federal spending when it comes to stopping the president’s gross overreach of executive power," Broun spokeswoman Christine Hardman said.

Spokespeople for Garrett and Massie did not respond to requests for comment.

No Democrats voted for the resolution. A handful of vulnerable Democrats typically break with their party on major issues, such as holding former Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner in contempt of Congress. But House Democrats held the party line this time.