Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), the lead Senate sponsor of the bill, said the legislation would help improve the treatment of third-country workers who are lured to work in Iraq and Afghanistan only to be defrauded or enslaved.

"Modern-day slavery by government contractors — unknowingly funded by American taxpayers — is unconscionable and intolerable," Blumenthal said. "Current law prohibiting human trafficking is insufficient and ineffective, failing to prevent or punish abuses.

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"By increasing preventative scrutiny and investigation, this legislation will stop egregious human-rights abuses on U.S. military bases, increasing security for our troops and preventing waste of taxpayer dollars."

A co-sponsor, Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFlorida questions Senate chairman over claim that Russians have ‘penetrated’ election systems A paid leave plan cannot make you choose between kids or retirement New sanctions would hurt Russia — but hurt American industry more MORE (R-Fla.), said it is unacceptable that these abuses are often supported by U.S. taxpayer dollars.

"This bill will help crack down on this dehumanizing practice, particularly in government contracting labor operations, and I am proud to support it as one more step we can do to punish human-rights abuses," Rubio said.

Under the bill, contractors with contracts worth $1 million or more would have to implement plans to prevent all abusive practices, and would have to notify the government if they have evidence that a subcontractor is involved in prohibited conduct.

The enforcement provisions of the bill would allow for criminal penalties, in part by expanding current rules related to the treatment of foreign workers inside the United States to foreign workers outside the country. The bill would also allow the government to remove certain employees or suspend contractors when violations are found.

Blumenthal's bill, S. 2234, is also co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Judiciary announces Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing NRA will spend M to support Kavanaugh for Supreme Court: report Planned Parenthood launches six-figure Supreme Court ad campaign MORE (R-Maine), Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenDem senator who replaced Franken on his future in Minnesota: 'It's complicated' Gillibrand: If George Soros is mad I stood up for women ‘that’s on him’ Franken: I miss being a senator, haven't ruled out running for office again MORE (D-Minn.), Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillStudy: 3 of every 10 House candidate websites vulnerable to hacks Unions see Missouri win as red state watershed US suspected Russia was behind 2016 cyberattacks against Swedish news organizations: report MORE (D-Mo.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators introduce bill to change process to levy national security tariffs A single courageous senator can derail the Trump administration GOP senator warns against 'fishing expedition' for Kavanaugh documents MORE (R-Ohio).

The House companion bill, H.R. 4259, was sponsored by Rep. James Lankford (R-Okla.), and is co-sponsored by House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) and Reps. Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump optimistic about GOP’s midterm prospects as Republicans fret Overnight Energy: New EPA chief faces test before Congress | Trump officials tout progress on air quality | Dem bill would force watchdog to keep investigating Pruitt Hillicon Valley: Senators working on new Russia sanctions bill | Defense bill includes cyber warfare policy | Hatch tells Google he's still alive | Dem wants tech execs back before Congress | Facebook gets foothold in China MORE (D-Va.), Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) and Chris Smith (R-N.J.).

Issa's committee is scheduled to hold a hearing on the bill Tuesday morning at 10 a.m., with Blumenthal and Portman expected to testify on the bill at that time.