"Nor does H.R. 9 do much to promote economic growth because it does little to reward new productivity at the margin," he added. "At best it produces a one-year 'sugar high' until the bills come due."

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Several Democrats made the same point during debate on the bill, H.R. 9, by noting that it would add $46 billion to the budget deficit in just one year. House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by CVS Health — Trump’s love-hate relationship with the Senate Race for Republican Speaker rare chance to unify party for election Scalise allies upset over Ryan blindside on McCarthy endorsement MORE (R-Va.) said he would prefer comprehensive tax reform, but said a temporary tax cut is at least some short-term help to companies.

McClintock disagreed.

"Tax cuts without either spending reductions or real economic growth are an illusion," he said. "Real tax reform would permanently reduce the marginal tax rate for all businesses and cut government spending concurrently. This would encourage and reward growth, shift investment decisions from politicians to entrepreneurs, and not rob our economy of its future."

Other Republicans voting against the tax cut were Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashGOP rep refutes Trump's account of Sanford attacks: 'People were disgusted' Trump claims Sanford remarks booed by lawmakers were well-received GOP congressman blasts Trump’s attack on Sanford as ‘classless’ MORE (Mich.), Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (Ga.), Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberryThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Tensions mount for House Republicans Koch-backed group to target some Republicans over spending vote in new ad campaign Budget chairman Womack eyes appropriations switch MORE (Neb.), Raúl Labrador (Idaho), Steven LaTourette (Ohio), Cynthia LummisCynthia Marie LummisLobbying world Female lawmakers flee House for higher office, retirement Despite a battle won, 'War on Coal' far from over MORE (Wyo.), Mick Mulvaney (S.C.), Reid RibbleReid James RibbleWith Trump, conservatives hope for ally in 'War on Christmas' GOP rushes to embrace Trump House stays Republican as GOP limits losses MORE (Wis.) and Rob WoodallWilliam (Rob) Robert WoodallMay brings key primaries across nation Path to Dem majority lies in well-educated districts McConnell, Schumer tap colleagues to explore budget reform MORE (Ga.). Rep. Frank WolfFrank Rudolph WolfVulnerable Republican keeps focus as Democrats highlight Trump Bolton could be the first national security chief to prioritize religious freedom House votes to mandate sexual harassment training for members and staff MORE (R-Va.) voted "present."