One amendment from Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), for example, would have put restrictions on timber exports for land granted to an Indian tribe in Alaska. But that proposal was killed in a 184-236 vote.

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Another, from Rep. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyDemocrats search for 51st net neutrality vote Overnight Regulation: Dems claim 50 votes in Senate to block net neutrality repeal | Consumer bureau takes first step to revising payday lending rule | Trump wants to loosen rules on bank loans | Pentagon, FDA to speed up military drug approvals Dems say they have 50 votes in Senate to overrule net neutrality repeal MORE (D-Mass.), would have authorized a fee increase from the Department of the Interior to offset the cost of administering livestock grazing programs on federal land. But that was defeated 156-268.

Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) proposed the elimination of language from the bill that would allow Customs and Border Protection officials to operate on federal border lands without having to comply with various environmental laws. This section of the bill was the most contested piece of the bill during debate, and the House rejected Grijalva's amendment by a 177-247 vote.

Another Democratic amendments was withdrawn — from Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii) to exempt Hawaii from that controversial border language.

The House accepted two Republican amendments. One from Rep. Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopGOP chairman slams federal agency involved in Cliven Bundy case GAO finds inconsistencies in processing offshore oil testing Overnight Energy: Senate close to approving Arctic drilling | EPA cancels controversial media tracking contract | Trump officials sound alarm on mineral imports MORE (R-Utah) would reduce the number of environmental laws that border agents would be exempted from, and it was approved by voice vote. The other was a technical corrections amendment from Rep. Doc HastingsRichard (Doc) Norman HastingsCongress just resolved a 20-year debate over Neolithic remains Boehner hires new press secretary GOP plots new course on Endangered Species Act reform MORE (R-Wash.).

Language from Rep. Chip Cravaack (R-Minn.) would have allowed all-terrain vehicles access to the Superior and Chippewa National Forest, but it was never offered.