Assistant House Minority Leader Jim ClyburnJames (Jim) Enos ClyburnOvernight Tech: Dem FCC commish stepping down | Lawmakers clash over internet 'fast lanes' | Tech giants vow not to help government cyberattacks | Tax filers to get extension after IRS tech troubles Black unemployment jumped in January up from record low The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (D-S.C.) on Tuesday said the recent trend of police shootings of unarmed African American men bears similarities to the civil rights movement.

Clyburn said that he attended the funeral of Walter Scott in South Carolina. Scott was shot and killed earlier this month by a police officer who has since been charged with murder.

The third-ranking House Democrat, a former history teacher, said the legislative proposals such as requiring police officer to wear body cameras are reminiscent of efforts to secure equality for African Americans in the civil rights era.

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"I can say that it is clear to me that a lot of the legislation that is being proposed today, a lot of the activities that we are experiencing today, we went through this before," Clyburn said on the House floor.

"I am hopeful ... that Congress would take a long hard look at whether or not there's a role for us to play in responding to what seems to be an epidemic," Clyburn added.

In a separate speech following Clyburn, Rep. Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanApple tells senator it may give rebates to consumers who bought iPhone batteries Photo catches Dem playing Candy Crush during State of the Union Tech trade association tells lawmakers it will create a 'director of diversity' role MORE (D-N.J.) says she personally worries about the safety of her male relatives.

"I stand here as an African American woman who represents the state of the New Jersey, but I stand here as a wife, a mother, a sister, an aunt, and a cousin to African American men. And in that capacity, each and every day that one of them leaves our presence and leaves their home, I wonder, will they come back safely?" Watson Coleman said.

Another member of the Congressional Black Caucus, Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.), said Monday that "it feels like open season on black men."