If Friday was any signal, it should go a lot easier than the sequester talks went. President Obama and congressional leaders in both parties left their Friday meeting in seeming agreement that the last thing the country needs now is a government shutdown.

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Still, one point of contention could surface, related to how the House deals with the Defense Department and Veterans Affairs. House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan Cantor'Release the memo' — let's stop pretending that Democrats are the defenders of the FBI Raúl Labrador, a model for Hispanic politicians reaching higher Eric Cantor: Moore ‘deserves to lose’ MORE (R-Va.) said the GOP would pass a bill that gives those departments more deference in how to spend their money for the rest of the fiscal year, partly to let them start new programs.

That's a privilege other departments won't get. Democrats this week were already arguing that this appears to be a way to make it easier for DOD to handle the spending sequester, which took effect today.

That could be a sign that the Democratic Senate might seek to change the bill, although the Senate reaction won't be known until later in the month.

The Senate has a very light week of floor work, and might only deal with a few judicial nominations and possibly the nomination of John Brennan to be the next CIA director.

On Tuesday, the Senate is expected to vote on a resolution outlining Senate committee budgets for the rest of the year.

Off the floor, however, the Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a markup of legislation from Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinCoalition of 44 groups calls for passage of drug pricing bill An open letter to the FBI agent who resigned because of Trump Nunes 'memo' drama proves it: Republicans can't govern, they only campaign MORE (D-Calif.) that would reinstate the assault weapons ban. That markup is likely to lead to floor consideration later in the month.

In the House, a subcommittee will hold a hearing that aims to reorient the conversation to the link between gun violence and mental illness. Several Republicans have argued that the focus of Democrats is only on guns, but not mental illness.

One Republican, Rep. Frank WolfFrank Rudolph WolfHouse votes to mandate sexual harassment training for members and staff Trump, global religious freedom needs US ambassador to lead Bottom Line MORE (R-Va.), has called for tighter rules on violent TV shows, movies and video games in response to last year's shootings, and said it is too easy for Democrats to only focus on gun makers.

The American-Israel Public Affairs Committee's (AIPAC) annual policy conference starts on Sunday, and as usual it will feature remarks from key members of the House and Senate.

Cantor and Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) will speak at the event, as will Vice President Biden, Rep. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeHouse rejects effort to condemn lawmaker for demanding 'Dreamer' arrests Hispanic Dems seek vote to condemn GOP lawmaker for demanding arrests of 'Dreamers' Dem lawmaker: ‘We are seeing the dumbing down of the presidency’ MORE (D-Ohio) and Sens. John CornynJohn CornynDems confront Kelly after he calls some immigrants 'lazy' McConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration GOP senators turning Trump immigration framework into legislation MORE (R-Texas), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandBritish health secretary fires back at Trump over universal health care claims Trump on Dems’ ‘universal' health-care push: ‘No thanks’ Gillibrand calls for DOJ to investigate US Olympic Committee over abuse scandal MORE (D-N.Y.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Meghan McCain: Melania is 'my favorite Trump, by far' Kelly says Trump not likely to extend DACA deadline MORE (R-Ariz.) and Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezJustice Dept intends to re-try Menendez in corruption case DACA is neither bipartisan nor in America's interest Senate DACA deal picks up GOP supporters MORE (D-N.J.).

Below is a more detailed look at the week ahead:

Monday

The House meets at noon, and will start legislative work at 2 p.m. The only bill up that day is the Senate-amended H.R. 307, which would reauthorize several federal programs aimed at ensuring the U.S. is prepared for biological, chemical or other disasters or attacks.

This is a suspension bill that will require a two-thirds majority vote, but it should pass easily as the House has already approved a similar version earlier this year.

The Senate meets at 2 p.m., and at 5:30 p.m. is expected to vote on two judicial nominations: Pamela Chen to be a district judge for the Eastern District of New York, and Katherine Failla to be a district judge for the Southern District of New York.

Tuesday

The House starts work at noon, and will take up two suspension bills:

H.R. 668, which would require the president's budget submissions to Congress to estimate the amount of the deficit per taxpayer, and

H.R. 338, which would apply tobacco smuggling rules to the U.S. territories.

The Senate is expected to vote on a resolution, S.Res. 64, which authorizes committee expenditures for the rest of fiscal year 2013.

The Senate is in for the rest of the week, but has no firm plans after Tuesday. The Senate could, however, use one day to consider the Brennan nomination.

Wednesday-Thursday


The House starts at noon Wednesday on the continuing resolution for the rest of 2013. As of Friday, the resolution did not exist, but Republicans had named it the Department of Defense, Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act.

Friday


The House is not in session.