The bill is not listed as a companion bill to the one introduced by Paul and Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day HHS official put on leave amid probe into social media posts Trump, Pence to address CPAC this week MORE (R-Texas) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeThe 14 GOP senators who voted against Trump’s immigration framework Prison sentencing bill advances over Sessions objections Grassley ‘incensed’ by Sessions criticism of proposed sentencing reform legislation MORE (R-Utah), although it appears to have the same goal as the Senate bill. That bill, S. 505, explicitly prohibits the use of drones to kill U.S. citizens.

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"The Federal Government may not use a drone to kill a citizen of the United States who is located in the United States," the Senate bill reads. "The prohibition under this subsection shall not apply to an individual who poses an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury to another individual. Nothing in this section shall be construed to suggest that the Constitution would otherwise allow the killing of a citizen of the United States in the United States without due process of law."

Cruz, the lead sponsor of the Senate bill, introduced it a day after Paul's March 6 filibuster on the Senate floor, in which he called on the Obama administration to clarify its policy regarding domestic drone strikes. On March 7, Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderPavlich: The claim Trump let the mentally ill get guns is a lie Pennsylvania Supreme Court releases new congressional map 36 people who could challenge Trump in 2020 MORE wrote to Paul to say the government does not have any authority to use drones against U.S. citizens on U.S. soil that don't pose an immediate threat.

Paul said he pressed the issue after Holder seemed to waffle in answering a question about whether these sorts of drone strikes are legal. But Paul's filibuster was criticized that week by Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (R-Ariz.), who accused Paul of doing a "disservice" to Americans by "making them think that somehow they're in danger from their government."