Her bill, H.R. 1395, is co-sponsored by Reps. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeLawmakers push regulators on how Amazon's Whole Foods deal could affect 'food deserts' Dems announce 'unity commission' members If Democrats want to take back the White House start now MORE (D-Ohio), Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), and Terri SewellTerri SewellLive coverage: Day two of the Ways and Means GOP tax bill markup Dems call for B to boost rural broadband Ex-CIA chief: Trump will do 'lasting harm to American society' MORE (D-Ala.).

The bill is the latest entry to the list of legislation meant to tweak the national school lunch program. Sen. Tom HarkinTom HarkinThe Hill's 12:30 Report Distance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday Grassley challenger no stranger to defying odds MORE (D-Iowa), for example, has proposed the Healthy Lifestyles and Prevention America Act, S. 39, which would broaden the federal nutrition program, including by expanding it to childcare centers.

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Other proposals have been made by members looking to limit school lunch guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Last year, the USDA proposed calorie caps on school lunches, along with caps on grains and proteins that children can eat in meals served by schools.

The agency has since waived the cap on grains and proteins for two years. But last week, Rep. Rick CrawfordRichard (Rick) CrawfordLobbying World Progressive group running ads opposing tax cuts for the wealthy Lawmakers send well-wishes to Scalise on Twitter MORE (R-Ark.) proposed the Sensible School Lunch Act, which would permanently eliminate those caps.

Crawford's bill, H.R. 1244, keeps in place the calorie caps that the USDA recommended. But Crawford says that repealing the grains and protein caps would give schools the flexibility to feed children properly.

"USDA's new school nutrition regulations are not working and are leaving students hungry," Crawford said last week. "In October, I hosted a Nutrition Summit in my district where I listened to school administrators, parents, nutritionists and teachers tell me how the nutrition guidelines are affecting their students."

Sens. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenSenate tax plan may delay corporate rate cut by one year: report Pence to visit ICBM base The Hill's Whip List: Republicans try again on ObamaCare repeal MORE (R-N.D.) and Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) have proposed the Sensible School Lunch Act in the Senate.

Also last week, Reps. Fudge and Steve Stivers (R-Ohio) and proposed the bipartisan School Nutrition Flexibility Act, which also removes the protein and grain limit in school meals.

That bill, H.R. 1303, also lets local school authorities set prices for school meals. That would counteract the USDA's rule that set school lunch prices for the first time since 1946.

Last year, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) proposed the No Hungry Kids Act, which would repeal the department's calorie caps on meals served by schools.