Her bill, H.R. 1395, is co-sponsored by Reps. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeFarm bill abandons endangered wildlife House rejects effort to condemn lawmaker for demanding 'Dreamer' arrests Hispanic Dems seek vote to condemn GOP lawmaker for demanding arrests of 'Dreamers' MORE (D-Ohio), Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellUS lawmakers celebrate the royal wedding Twitter CEO meets with lawmakers to talk net neutrality, privacy Record number of black women running for office in Alabama after Roy Moore defeat MORE (D-Ala.).

The bill is the latest entry to the list of legislation meant to tweak the national school lunch program. Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinDem Senator open to bid from the left in 2020 Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Trump should require federal contractors to follow the law MORE (D-Iowa), for example, has proposed the Healthy Lifestyles and Prevention America Act, S. 39, which would broaden the federal nutrition program, including by expanding it to childcare centers.

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Other proposals have been made by members looking to limit school lunch guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Last year, the USDA proposed calorie caps on school lunches, along with caps on grains and proteins that children can eat in meals served by schools.

The agency has since waived the cap on grains and proteins for two years. But last week, Rep. Rick CrawfordRichard (Rick) CrawfordWhy DOJ must block the Cigna-Express Scripts merger Elvis impersonator named Elvis Presley running for Congress Overnight Tech: Senate Dems want FCC chief recused from Sinclair merger | Tech rallies on Capitol Hill for DACA | Facebook beefs up lobbying ranks MORE (R-Ark.) proposed the Sensible School Lunch Act, which would permanently eliminate those caps.

Crawford's bill, H.R. 1244, keeps in place the calorie caps that the USDA recommended. But Crawford says that repealing the grains and protein caps would give schools the flexibility to feed children properly.

"USDA's new school nutrition regulations are not working and are leaving students hungry," Crawford said last week. "In October, I hosted a Nutrition Summit in my district where I listened to school administrators, parents, nutritionists and teachers tell me how the nutrition guidelines are affecting their students."

Sens. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenSenate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA GOP lawmakers want Trump to stop bashing Congress Chao names participants selected for drone pilot program MORE (R-N.D.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) have proposed the Sensible School Lunch Act in the Senate.

Also last week, Reps. Fudge and Steve Stivers (R-Ohio) and proposed the bipartisan School Nutrition Flexibility Act, which also removes the protein and grain limit in school meals.

That bill, H.R. 1303, also lets local school authorities set prices for school meals. That would counteract the USDA's rule that set school lunch prices for the first time since 1946.

Last year, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) proposed the No Hungry Kids Act, which would repeal the department's calorie caps on meals served by schools.