"The PRIME Act is what I like to call a win-win for those of us who are concerned about protecting Medicare and Medicaid by ensuring that these programs have the resources to provide excellent care for beneficiaries and that taxpayer dollars are spent responsibility and effectively," said Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee Chairman Tom CarperTom CarperOvernight Energy: Trump White House kicks off 'Energy Week' Senate confirms NRC chairwoman to new term Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity MORE (D-Del.), the lead Senate sponsor of the bill.

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"Put simply, this bipartisan legislation builds on previous reforms by enacting additional common sense measures to better protect Medicare and Medicaid against instances of waste, fraud, and abuse."

Sen. Tom CoburnTom Coburn'Path of least resistance' problematic for Congress Freedom Caucus saved Paul Ryan's job: GOP has promises to keep Don't be fooled: Carper and Norton don't fight for DC MORE (Okla.), the top Republican on the committee, said the bill reflects the recommendations of many health experts, and is needed to ensure Medicare and Medicaid spending goes to the people who need healthcare access.

"Americans who rely on Medicare and Medicaid expect Congress to work together to reduce waste and fraud," Coburn said. "Improper payments divert scarce resources away from those most in need."

The legislation makes numerous reforms to the two programs, including the imposition of tougher penalties for Medicare and Medicaid fraud, and makes efforts to reduce improper payments under those programs.

The bill also seeks to phase out the "pay and chase" policy, under which the programs generally make payments without making an upfront effort to determine if the recipients of these payments are legitimate. A statement on Coburn's website said Medicare makes tens of billions of dollars in overpayments that are now spotted by private contractors, but only after the fact.

"The program's current pay-and-chase model pays out even suspicious Medicare claims, costing taxpayers billions of dollars," said Rep. Peter Roskam (R-Ill.), the lead House sponsor of the bill. "By combining 21st century technology and common sense solutions, the PRIME Act can help stop fraudsters in their tracks and make Medicare and Medicaid more financially stable for the long term."

The bill would take several other specific steps to stop wasteful Medicare and Medicaid spending. One example is a new effort by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services to ensure people don't steal the identities of deceased doctors and use them to claim reimbursements from the government.

The bill also requires Medicare officials to talk more with Medicare beneficiaries to help them spot waste and fraud, including by showing them how to review their Medicare statements for inaccuracies.

Rep. John Carney (Del.), the lead House Democrat on the bill, said he's hopeful that the bipartisan support for cutting waste in order to help seniors can win easy support in Congress this year.

"These days, finding areas where Democrats and Republicans can agree isn't always easy," he said. "But cracking down on waste, fraud and abuse is something we can all get behind."

The Senate bill is S. 1123, and is supported by Sens. Michael BennetMichael BennetDems step up attacks on GOP ObamaCare bill Trump welcomes Gorsuch on first Supreme Court visit Why higher education is in need of regulatory relief MORE (D-Colo.), Chris CoonsChris CoonsFuneral for the filibuster: GOP will likely lay Senate tool to rest Overnight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Overnight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | MORE (D-Del.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharAmazon primed for merger battle Time to get Trump’s new antitrust cop on the beat Going national with automatic voter registration MORE (D-Minn.), Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuWhite House encourages viewing of anti-CNN James O'Keefe video New O’Keefe video shows CNN producer calling Russia coverage ‘mostly bull----’ GOP’s message on ObamaCare is us versus them MORE (D-La.), Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillMcCaskill attended reception at Russian ambassador's residence in 2015 Senators question need for HHS cyber office Overnight Cybersecurity: Obama DHS chief defends Russian hack response | Trump huddles on grid security | Lawmakers warned about cyber threat to election systems MORE (D-Mo.) and Mark WarnerMark WarnerOvernight Finance: GOP divided over welfare cuts in budget | Lawmaker loses M on pharma stock he pitched | Yellen says another financial crisis unlikely in our lifetimes Overnight Cybersecurity: Obama faces new scrutiny for Russia response | UK parliament cyberattacked | Election hacking fears put heat on DHS | Feds appeal to Supreme Court over data warrants Election hacking fears turn heat on Homeland Security MORE (D-Va.). The House bill is H.R. 2305, and is backed by Reps. Ron BarberRon BarberGiffords to lawmakers avoiding town halls: 'Have some courage' Ten House seats Dems hope Trump will tilt House conducts moment of silence for Tucson shooting anniversary MORE (D-Ariz.), Randy Hultgren (R-Ill.), Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) and Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.).