The issue of state control was central to many of the amendments debated on Thursday. In a 241-182 vote, members accepted language from Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-Mo.) that adds a sense of Congress that state and local education agencies should maintain the right to determine the curriculum for elementary and secondary education.

And in a 239-187 vote, the House approved language from Rep. Pat Meehan (R-Pa.) that ensures the federal government will not impose any additional requirements on states unless authorized by law.

Several other states-rights amendments were approved Thursday evening by voice vote, a full listing of which can be found below.

In another roll call vote, the House agreed 263-161 to add an amendment from Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungPension committee must deliver on retirement promise Our leaders must end the hate before they burn America down Alaska rep denies suggesting armed Jews could have prevented Holocaust MORE (R-Alaska) that would maintain current education programs for American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians.

Other amendments handled by voice vote or otherwise disposed of by early Thursday evening were from:

— John Kline (R-Minn.), clarifying in a managers amendment that a state opting not to receive funds shall not be required to carry out any federal education requirements, and making technical changes. Accepted in voice vote.

— Tony Cardenas (D-Calif.), increasing funding under the bill for English language learned from $750 million to $775 million through fiscal 2019. Withdrawn.

Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson Lee'Westworld' star tells lawmakers about rape in plea for assault victims NFL player who kneeled for national anthem tackles Capitol Hill 'externship' Former Comey aide grilled by House panel for over seven hours MORE (D-Texas), requiring states to focus federal funding on schools serving English learners, migrant students and other at-risk students. Accepted in voice vote.

Kerry BentivolioKerry BentivolioIndiana Republican: Leaders duped me Reindeer farmer saves 'cromnibus' with yes vote High drama as .1T spending package advances by one vote MORE (R-Mich.), requiring states to consult with private companies as they develop their education plan. Accepted in voice vote.

Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersHouse passes school safety bill amid gun protests House GOP frets over Pennsylvania race House poised to pass school safety measure MORE (R-Wash.), reinstating a requirement that states spend 1 percent of federal funding on students with disabilities. Withdrawn.

— Tom Reed (R-N.Y.), clarifying that state and local governments can use multiple measures to identify academic performance measurements. Accepted in voice vote.

Dan BenishekDaniel (Dan) Joseph BenishekRepublican groups launch final ad blitz in key House battlegrounds Tea Party class reassesses record Michigan Republican to retire MORE (R-Mich.), encouraging states to report on the number of students attaining career and technical education proficiencies. Accepted in voice vote.

— Joe Heck (R-Nev.), giving local education agencies the option of entering into partnerships to start programs serving youth in correctional facilities. Accepted in voice vote.

— Steve Scalise (R-La.), stating that there is no federal mandate for states to conduct teacher evaluations. Accepted in voice vote.

Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MoorePelosi rips Trump administration's 'thought control' on CDC Dem: Trump banning words in CDC documents ‘deeply disturbing and offensive’ Dem rep: Moore supporter called my office pretending to be a reporter, shouted racial slurs MORE (D-Wis.), delaying implementation of federal funding formulas until the secretary of Education finds that it will not cut funding to schools serving poor students. Accepted in voice vote.

Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopTribe clashes with Zinke on need for Mexican border wall Industry should comply with the Methane Waste Prevention Rule Zinke: I never took a private jet anywhere MORE (R-Utah), eliminating language that allows grant money to bypass states to go right to local districts. Accepted in voice vote.