Obama is expected to use his visit to the mostly Republican state to propose a cut in corporate tax rates. But he will also propose pairing that tax cut with new federal jobs programs.

Republicans have indicated they can't agree to Obama's proposal because it ignores individual income tax rates.

"This proposal allows President Obama to support President Obama's position on taxes and President Obama's position on spending, while leaving small businesses and American families behind," said Michael Steel, a spokesman for House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerNetanyahu: 'No question' about Trump's support for Israel The Hill's 12:30 Report Boehner compares Trump to Teddy Roosevelt MORE (R-Ohio).

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Black predicted that Obama's remarks would ignore the effects that the 2010 healthcare law are having on economic growth. She also said Obama could approve the Keystone pipeline and stop pursuing heavy regulatory burdens if he wanted to see job growth.

"The facts speak for themselves: since President Obama was elected, two Americans have gone on food stamps for every one that has found work," she said. "This is unacceptable and why the president needs to park Air Force One and start working with Congress to pursue policies that will help rather than hurt the American people."

A Tuesday report in The Tennessean said Republicans are not expected to attend Obama's speech today. Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderGOP eyes big gamble on ObamaCare Mnuchin, Price meet with GOP senators Reid bids farewell to the Senate MORE (R-Tenn.) told the paper that he wants to hear Obama explain how companies can create jobs "and at the same time pay all the additional costs imposed by the president's healthcare law."

Alexander is scheduled to hold a meeting in Nashville today with Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulTrump stumps for Louisiana Senate candidate ahead of runoff Giuliani won't serve in Trump administration Will justice in America be Trumped? MORE (R-Ky.) on the issue of charter schools.

An aide to Sen. Bob CorkerBob CorkerSenate passes dozens of bills on way out of town Ukrainians made their choice for freedom, but now need US help Week ahead in defense: Anticipation builds for State pick; Pentagon chief's last trip abroad MORE (R-Tenn.) told the paper that Corker is busy in Washington with various committee hearings and possible votes.