DeFazio proposed an amendment that would have delayed the streamlining of environmental rules until the backlog of water is reduced to $20 billion or less.

"There's no evidence that the public participation environmental review process has caused delay," said Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.). "The problem is not NEPA. The problem is that this Congress has failed to appropriate enough money to keep up with the projects we authorize."

Republicans took the view that environmental rules should still be streamlined in order to help projects get off the ground more quickly.

"The amendment seeks to undermine all environmental streamlining provisions in WRRDA," said Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster (R-Pa.). "Regardless of the existence of backlogs, streamlining environment reviews is an essential reform and I believe it will help to reduce backlogs."

DeFazio's amendment was voted down 183-236.

The bipartisan bill de-authorizes $12 billion worth of projects from the backlog, which many members defended as a fiscally responsible move. Rep. Kerry BentivolioKerry BentivolioIndiana Republican: Leaders duped me Reindeer farmer saves 'cromnibus' with yes vote High drama as .1T spending package advances by one vote MORE (R-Mich.) proposed an amendment that would have de-authorized another $23 billion worth of projects, but the House voted that proposal down in a voice vote.

These amendments were among two dozen that were considered Wednesday afternoon. Others disposed of today were from:

— Bill Shuster (R-Pa.), managers amendment providing for the expediting of any ongoing feasibility study for prior authorized projects, and making other substantive and technical changes. Passed in voice vote.

Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresGOP focuses on law enforcement mistakes — not new gun laws Right revolts on budget deal Emboldened conservatives press Ryan to bring hard-right immigration bill to floor MORE (R-Texas), prohibiting any actions dealing with coastal and maritime spatial planning under an Obama administration order dealing with ocean preservation. Passed 225-193.

Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungPension committee must deliver on retirement promise Our leaders must end the hate before they burn America down Alaska rep denies suggesting armed Jews could have prevented Holocaust MORE (R-Alaska.), requiring the Army Corps of Engineers to contract with private sector surveying and mapping companies when possible. Rejected in voice vote.

— Alcee Hastings (D-Fla.), including operation and maintenance costs associated with sand transfer plants in the annual budget of the Army Corps of Engineers. Failed 133-287.

— Walter Jones (R-N.C.), exempting the disaster restriction on projects that non-federal interests may contribute to. Withdrawn.

— Nydia Velazquez (D-N.Y.), establishing a water-based freight policy to improve freight and cargo over waterways. Rejected in voice vote.

— Cedric Richmond (D-La.), directing the Army Corps to calculate the benefits of proposed flood prevention projects. Passed 237-183.

Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSen. Gardner won’t let Jeff Sessions tread on Colorado’s cannabis boom Trump presses GOP to change Senate rules Republicans insist tax law will help in midterms MORE (R-Colo.), establishing an Office of Water Storage at the Army Corps. Withdrawn.

Members also approved several en bloc by unanimous consent, which allowed the House to finish up amendments much earlier than first planned. Those amendments were from:

— Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.), requiring a government study on how drought-affected regions of the country are having trouble meeting federal guidelines on lake levels.

Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeHouse Judiciary chair to subpoena for FBI documents Judiciary Dems warn Trump: Don't fire Mueller, Sessions during House recess 'Westworld' star tells lawmakers about rape in plea for assault victims MORE (D-Texas), requiring the government to consult with minority stakeholders on projects that substantially affect them.

— Michael Grimm (R-N.Y.), requiring the Secretary of the Army to include flood and storm damage plans in its annual report to Congress.

— Scott Peters (D-Calif.), requiring the Secretary of the Army to coordinate with FEMA when disseminating emergency communications.

— Marlin Stutzman (R-Ind.), requiring the Secretary of the Army not to insist on the removal of levee vegetation until guidelines on removal are adopted.

— Pedro Pierluisi (D-P.R.), adding Puerto Rico to a section of law authorizing the Secretary of the Army to waive cost-sharing requirements.

Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonOvernight Health Care: House passes .3T omnibus | Bill boosts funds for NIH, opioid treatment | Senators spar over ObamaCare fix | 'Right to Try' bill heads to the Senate Overnight Regulation: Omnibus includes deal on tip-pooling rule | Groups sue over rules for organic livestock | AT&T, DOJ make opening arguments in merger trial GOP senators push tougher sentencing for synthetic opioid MORE (R-Ark.), allowing non-federal entities to collaborate with the Army Corps on selling excess water supply.

Doc HastingsRichard (Doc) Norman HastingsCongress just resolved a 20-year debate over Neolithic remains Boehner hires new press secretary GOP plots new course on Endangered Species Act reform MORE (R-Wash.), ensuring that Congress continues the practice of authorizing project purposes at Army Corps dams or reservoirs.

— Betty McCollum (D-Minn.), setting up a multi-agency effort to slow the spread of Asian carp in the Upper Mississippi and Ohio River basins.

— Mike Thompson (D-Calif.), requiring the Government Accountability Office to conduct an assessment on the impacts of aquatic invasive species on federal assets.

Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyWorst engineering failure in U.S. history made us safer GOP leaders prevent votes to ban federal spending at Trump businesses Dem whip asks Ryan to allow floor votes on DACA this week MORE (D-Calif.), requiring the Army Corps to consider activities of the Secretary of the Navy when assessing the operation and maintenance needs of harbors.

— Alan Lowenthal (D-Calif.), requiring the government to include "expanded uses" of the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund in reports to Congress.

— Brownley, requiring a GAO study on the effectiveness of activities funded by the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund.

— Bradley Schneider (D-Ill.), expanding congressional reporting requirements to include recommendations for mitigating current problems and limiting the construction backlog.