Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill
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House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Abortion-rights group endorses Nadler in race to replace Conyers on Judiciary Trump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday blasted her home state GOP colleagues for supporting the House tax-reform bill despite the risk to their districts posed by eliminating the state and local tax deduction.

Pelosi emphasized that the legislation would have failed without the support of 11 California Republicans, many of whom are among Democrats’ top targets heading into the 2018 midterm elections.

“The more Californians learn about the bill, the more pressure Republicans will be under to change it. Only if California Republicans understand the political consequences will the bill be stopped,” Pelosi said in a statement.

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Only three California Republicans — Reps. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaTrump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Giffords gun group targets Issa over concealed carry bill The Hill Interview: Missouri Republican has gavel on his radar MORE, Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockPelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill The 13 House Republicans who voted against the GOP tax plan House passes sweeping tax bill in huge victory for GOP MORE and Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherMueller grand jury to question Flynn associate: report GOP lawmaker says FBI seeking interview about Assange meeting Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE — were among the 13 GOP defectors last week. House GOP leaders could only have afforded 23 defections and still passed the legislation.

The three California GOP lawmakers who opposed the bill all cited the legislation’s proposed elimination of the state and local tax deduction, which many of their constituents use to prevent double taxation in a high-tax state. The House GOP tax plan would also cap the property tax deduction at $10,000, unlike the Senate version which does not include such a provision.

“Unfortunately, I fear that the plan as approved could actually make the incredible burden our state’s taxpayers feel even worse. I voted no because my constituents don’t deserve a tax increase,” Issa wrote in an Orange County Register op-ed.

The rest of the Republican members in the California congressional delegation, led by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthy34 House Republicans demand DACA action this year GOP leaders agree to consider Dec. 30 spending bill House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama MORE (R-Calif.), voted for the legislation: Reps. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaPelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill Lawmakers urge FDA to modify brewery grain rules MORE, Paul CookPaul Joseph CookPelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill GOP rep.: Marine jailed in Mexico for 'simple mistake' MORE, Jeff DenhamJeffrey (Jeff) John Denham34 House Republicans demand DACA action this year The Hill Interview: Missouri Republican has gavel on his radar Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE, David Valadao, Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesTop intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father House Intel chairman planning contempt resolution against FBI, DOJ officials: report Ryan picks his negotiating team for tax cut bill MORE, Steve Knight, Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceState Dept insists cyber a priority despite office closure It’s time to use surgical strikes, naval blockades and more on North Korea Giffords targets 8 Republicans on conceal and carry in new ads MORE, Ken CalvertKenneth (Ken) Stanton CalvertMORE, Mimi Walters and Duncan HunterDuncan Duane HunterPelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill GOP lawmaker gives profane tribute to Trump Court upholds Obama rule banning vaping on airplanes MORE.

More than half of those lawmakers are at the top of Democrats’ target lists for next year’s elections. Denham, Valadao, Knight, Royce and Walters all represent crossover districts won by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE.

Some of those Republicans said that they voted for the legislation based on pledges from GOP leaders to make changes later.

Walters, for example, said in a statement that she “received a personal commitment” from House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyRyan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Senate approves motion to go to tax conference Overnight Finance: GOP delays work on funding bill amid conservative demands | Senate panel approves Fed nominee Powell | Dodd-Frank rollback advances | WH disputes report Mueller subpoenaed Trump bank records MORE (R-Texas) that “changes will be made to the final version of tax reform to benefit Orange County residents.”

An analysis by the Tax Policy Center found that 46 percent of returns filed in Walters’s district used the state and local tax deduction.

“Unfortunately, due to reckless tax and spend policies enacted by the California State Legislature, California suffers from the highest taxes in the nation. We must ensure Washington doesn’t put similar tax burdens on Orange County residents,” Walters said.

Valadao, meanwhile, said that only 17 percent of his Central Valley district’s residents currently itemize their tax returns and estimated that number would drop to 5 percent under the GOP tax proposal.

“By creating a simpler and fairer tax code, we will create jobs, grow our economy and increase the amount of money Central Valley workers take home,” Valadao said.