Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill
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House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiElection fears recede for House Republicans Senate harassment bill runs into opposition from House 2018 midterms: The blue wave or a red dawn? MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday blasted her home state GOP colleagues for supporting the House tax-reform bill despite the risk to their districts posed by eliminating the state and local tax deduction.

Pelosi emphasized that the legislation would have failed without the support of 11 California Republicans, many of whom are among Democrats’ top targets heading into the 2018 midterm elections.

“The more Californians learn about the bill, the more pressure Republicans will be under to change it. Only if California Republicans understand the political consequences will the bill be stopped,” Pelosi said in a statement.

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Only three California Republicans — Reps. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaSteyer-backed group launches 0,000 voter outreach campaign in California Election analyst moves four House seats toward GOP Dems step up efforts to avoid California primary shutouts MORE, Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockConservative group unveils plan to slash spending by trillion California Republicans seek turnout boost to avert midterm disaster California Dems endorse three candidates in pivotal House races MORE and Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherOvernight Finance: White House planning new tax cut proposal this summer | Schumer wants Congress to block reported ZTE deal | Tech scrambles to comply with new data rules Realtor group pulls support from GOP rep over comments about selling to LGBT homebuyers Jason Alexander teams up with Dem for campaign video MORE — were among the 13 GOP defectors last week. House GOP leaders could only have afforded 23 defections and still passed the legislation.

The three California GOP lawmakers who opposed the bill all cited the legislation’s proposed elimination of the state and local tax deduction, which many of their constituents use to prevent double taxation in a high-tax state. The House GOP tax plan would also cap the property tax deduction at $10,000, unlike the Senate version which does not include such a provision.

“Unfortunately, I fear that the plan as approved could actually make the incredible burden our state’s taxpayers feel even worse. I voted no because my constituents don’t deserve a tax increase,” Issa wrote in an Orange County Register op-ed.

The rest of the Republican members in the California congressional delegation, led by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyElection fears recede for House Republicans The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Trump now says Korea summit could still happen June 12 Ivanka to hit the campaign trail with McCarthy in California MORE (R-Calif.), voted for the legislation: Reps. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaHacker interrupts virtual congressional debate with gay porn Leaders warn Republicans against forcing immigration vote Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE, Paul CookPaul Joseph CookCongress thinks big to tackle a defining crisis of our times Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill GOP rep.: Marine jailed in Mexico for 'simple mistake' MORE, Jeff DenhamJeffrey (Jeff) John DenhamGOP nearing end game on immigration votes Centrists on cusp of forcing immigration votes as petition grows Jim Jordan as Speaker is change America needs to move forward MORE, David Valadao, Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — The art of walking away from the deal White House lawyer’s presence at FBI meetings sets off alarm bells for Dems Dems after briefing: 'No evidence' spy placed in Trump campaign MORE, Steve Knight, Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall Royce2018 midterms: The blue wave or a red dawn? Steyer-backed group launches 0,000 voter outreach campaign in California Election analyst moves four House seats toward GOP MORE, Ken CalvertKenneth (Ken) Stanton CalvertMORE, Mimi Walters and Duncan HunterDuncan Duane HunterOvernight Defense: Senate confirms Haspel as CIA chief | Trump offers Kim 'protections' if he gives up nukes | Dem amendments target Trump military parade Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Lawmakers take aim at Chinese tech giants in defense bill MORE.

More than half of those lawmakers are at the top of Democrats’ target lists for next year’s elections. Denham, Valadao, Knight, Royce and Walters all represent crossover districts won by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonElection fears recede for House Republicans To woo black voters in Georgia, Dems need to change their course of action Trump lawyer touts petition to stop 'soft coup' against Trump MORE.

Some of those Republicans said that they voted for the legislation based on pledges from GOP leaders to make changes later.

Walters, for example, said in a statement that she “received a personal commitment” from House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyOvernight Finance: White House planning new tax cut proposal this summer | Schumer wants Congress to block reported ZTE deal | Tech scrambles to comply with new data rules White House plans to release new tax cut proposal this summer Senate health committee to hold hearing on Trump drug pricing plan MORE (R-Texas) that “changes will be made to the final version of tax reform to benefit Orange County residents.”

An analysis by the Tax Policy Center found that 46 percent of returns filed in Walters’s district used the state and local tax deduction.

“Unfortunately, due to reckless tax and spend policies enacted by the California State Legislature, California suffers from the highest taxes in the nation. We must ensure Washington doesn’t put similar tax burdens on Orange County residents,” Walters said.

Valadao, meanwhile, said that only 17 percent of his Central Valley district’s residents currently itemize their tax returns and estimated that number would drop to 5 percent under the GOP tax proposal.

“By creating a simpler and fairer tax code, we will create jobs, grow our economy and increase the amount of money Central Valley workers take home,” Valadao said.