The Senate starts at 10 a.m. and will have to quickly decide whether to work on a three-month extension of emergency unemployment benefits or a yearlong extension.

Late Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidTop Lobbyists 2017: Grass roots Boehner confronted Reid after criticism from Senate floor GOP in uncharted territory rolling back rules through resolutions MORE (D-Nev.) announced a procedural vote on the three-month bill would be delayed while senators discuss the possibility of a yearlong bill.

ADVERTISEMENT
Reid said he opposes paying for an extension but said if a pay-for is necessary, Democrats would insist on a longer extension.

Ongoing negotiations could alter the Senate schedule, but if no deal is in sight, Senate Democrats could decide to hold a vote on adopting a motion to proceed to the three-month bill. That bill, S. 1845, was offered by Sens. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Raymond ReedAfter Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem McCain pledges 'rigorous oversight' after Air Force failure to report Texas gunman's conviction Dems furious over Air Force failure to report Texas shooter's conviction MORE (D-R.I.) and Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerBipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program Dem donor on MSNBC: 'Hopefully we'll get our sh-- together' The Hill interview — DNC chief: I came here to win elections MORE (R-Nev.).

The House also starts at 10 a.m., and in the afternoon, it will start work on legislation that would curb the authority of the Environmental Protection Agency.

The Reducing Excessive Deadline Obligations Act, H.R. 2279, combines three bills into one. In its latest form, it would ease rules requiring EPA review of solid waste regulations, prohibit the EPA from imposing duplicative solid waste rules on states and require federal facilities to comply with state-level environmental rules.

On Wednesday, the Obama administration threatened to veto the bill if approved by the House and Senate.

The House will start by debating and voting on a rule for the EPA bill. Then, it will debate the bill, consider two amendments and pass it.

The same rule that covers the EPA bill also covers two ObamaCare bills that will come up on Friday. Those bills would require weekly updates on the implementation of the healthcare law and require officials to tell people, if their personal health data has been compromised.